Mar 162015
 

httpvh://youtu.be/5pUBtZr5MYk

Learn to use a 10 stop ND filter for creative long exposure photography. Best practices, correcting color, getting the right exposure, and other tips.

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joshuacripps

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Mar 102015
 

httpvh://youtu.be/xPWDsQ4bCuo

If you’ve never used a circular polarizer filter before, here’s an interesting video by Mitch Bergsma that shows the effect it has on various outdoor scenes. He mounted a B+W Polarizer filter onto a couple of lenses…

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petapixel

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Feb 272015
 

Earlier this month, a leaked product page revealed a number of features that will be found in the upcoming Lightroom 6. One of them was an HDR merging tool that combines multiple exposures into a single HDR image. Here’s a first glimpse at how the feature will work.

First, select multiple versions of the same shot that were captured with exposure bracketing:

Read more:

Petapixel

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Feb 272015
 

 

Affinity2

“We have been trying out the Affinity Photo Beta over the last few days and we are impressed. It looks and feels like Photoshop, but it’s built with new fast code and will be an outright purchase when launched.

There have been possible Photoshop replacements before, the $30 Pixelmator app being one of them. We’ve tried that and it’s pretty good, a clean layout with robust backward compatibility with PSD files. It hasn’t convinced us yet to blow away the Cloud subscription, but if we were forced to use Pixelmator alone for images, it wouldn’t be a problem. Just a case of being very familiar with a piece of software and using it as it’s the path of least resistance.

So we weren’t first out of the blocks to download the Affinity Photo Beta when it was announced. We should have been as we now rather like this direct Photoshop competitor.”

Read More:

fcp

Feb 182015
 

newscreen

One of the more impressive services in the world of browser-based photo editing is Polarr, a web app that launched to the public back in September 2014. In just a handful of months, the 3-person startup has developed a service used by hundreds of thousands of people around the world.

The team tells us that they’ve just released Version 2.0 of the service in Alpha testing stage. It’s an update that delivers a handful of most-requested features submitted by the community.

Read More:

petapixel

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Feb 162015
 

Dan Marker-Moore’s cityscapes are dynamic, colorful and beautiful to behold. Spanning cities as diverse as New York, Washington D.C., Toronto and Los Angeles, the photos reflect cities in transition.

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pastemagazine

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Feb 112015
 

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From the time he was a young boy, around 10 years old, German photographer, Patrick Pnecht loved photography. He developed a fondness for photographing landscapes, people and weather. And like many of us, when he got his first DSLR five years ago, tried out many different genres of photography – from animal photography to 3D photography -before discovering his true passion, which lead him back to landscapes, people and weather all at once.

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Two years ago, Patrick read a book by Matt Kloskowski, landscape photographer and PhotoshopGuy. Within the last few pages, Matt mentioned compositing and also a photographer named Joel Grimes. After looking at Joel’s work, Patrick knew the genre he wanted to pursue. He wanted “to bring portraits into landscape photos or buildings.” From then on, Patrick began photographing landscapes during his vacations and compositing them with portraits shot in his studio. The creative possibilities were endless.

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slrlounge

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Dec 302014
 

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Before we begin this article, we want to explain that any photographer should always prioritize being artistic and having a creative vision above any technical aspect. But the two can work together very well if you have the right ideas. Photographers wanting to become more serious about their photos and photo editing should realize that one of the biggest ways to do this is to learn to read histograms. While you focus on making sure that you get as much as you can in the camera, what you get out of the camera will surely determine your post-production process.

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thephoblographer

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Nov 142014
 

In this 2-part webinar, professional photographer and educator Reed Hoffmann provides tips and techniques for capturing spontaneous HDR exposure brackets and merging, aligning de-ghosting and tone mapping them using the HDR Express 3 stand alone application and Adobe Lightroom plug-in. This Webinar was originally recorded on Nov 11, 2014.

httpvh://youtu.be/fudiQf8GYDw

httpvh://youtu.be/R99nCmpfg10

Download the Free trial or Buy it Now

Nov 022014
 

“HDR fans: Want a little more control than your camera can provide you with for your high dynamic range photos? If so, it’s time to switch to your computer and really take charge of your photography — and an update to Unified Color Technologies’ consumer-friendly HDR Express app is here to help.

Based around the same algorithms that underlie in the company’s flagship HDR Expose 3, the latest version of HDR Express keeps things simple while providing useful tools like automatic alignment and deghosting of your source imagery, as well as support for raw files from more than 600 different camera models. And if you use Adobe’s Photoshop Lightroom or Apple’s Aperture (the latter on the Mac only), then HDR Express will integrate as a plugin, ready to help you straight from your image library.”

–Mike Thomkins

Click the image below to read the full article:

hdr-express-3-mac-screenshot

Here is a video tutorial “Introducing HDR Express 3”, with John Omvik:

httpvh://youtu.be/Of5MEBX1HqQ

To download the HDR Express 3 free trial or to purchase with your HDR360pro discount

please click the image below:

express3_box_prodpg

Oct 312014
 

In this tutorial John Omvik demonstrates the basic Adobe Lightroom workflow using the HDR Express 3 plug-in with the full workflow to produce natural looking tone mapped images from high contrast (HDR) scenes.

httpvh://youtu.be/6lOSFJVjh6A

To purchase HDR Express 3 with your HDR360pro discount,
please click the image below:

express3_box_prodpg

Oct 312014
 
Please click the image below to download the free trial version:

Express-3-Email-Blast_pt-v4-670

 

To purchase HDR Express 3 with your HDR360pro discount,
please click the image below:

express3_box_prodpg

HDR Photography Beyond Your Imagination

Capturing a high contrast scene has always vexed photographers. We’ve all tried neutral density filters for landscapes and lighting equipment for interior shots in order to balance the wide range of light levels in our scenes. The results could be good but the work to get to the final image was intense. No longer!

Capturing high contrast scenes is now as simple as shooting three or more images of varying exposures and then merging those images into one high dynamic range file that reveals all your shadows and highlights. The magic is done with HDR software. But, not all HDR software is created equal.

Previously, HDR applications performed their contrast manipulation or “tone mapping” by creating an 8-bit or 16-bit image. Using an 8-bit or 16-bit file to create a large, high dynamic range file significantly reduces the file’s dynamic range, clips its color range and degrades the precision of image data.

That’s why we created our stand-alone HDR applications HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and the Photoshop plug-in 32 Float v3. These are the only HDR applications that merge multiple exposures into a full 32-bit file using our patented Beyond RGB™ color model. And, most importantly, these are the only HDR photo editing applications where all tools and operations work in 32-bit, floating-point precision.

Creating an HDR Image – One Click or Total Control

HDR Expose 3 and HDR Express 2 use powerful image alignment algorithms to create an HDR image from multiple exposures. The resulting 32-bit image is then ready to have its wide contrast range adjusted to fit into the contrast range of your output device. Unlike other HDR applications which “tone map” their 8-bit or 16-bit image into a useable range, our applications take all the valuable data in your HDR image and “dynamic range map” it into a file that retains naturally clear highlights, vibrant mid-tones and beautifully open shadows.

HDR Expose 3 and HDR Express 2 can do this for you with a single click using the Dynamic Range Mapping tool. And, with HDR Express you have additional one-step tone mapping and style preset buttons. You can also choose to have full control over the mapping process by individually adjusting the image’s dynamic range, brightness, highlights, shadows and saturation. With these powerful tools you can dial in a beautifully natural HDR image or a highly stylized image depending on your artistic vision.

Advantages of Working in 32-bit Mode in the Beyond RGB Color Space

In digital photography the colors and brightness of each pixel are recorded as binary numbers. Depending on the power of your image editing application the numbers used to describe those pixels are restricted to 8-bits (256) or 16-bits (65,535). Naturally, the more numbers you have available to you the more variation you can describe in each pixel. The more variation that you can describe, the richer and more detailed your digital image will be.

Because color information is restricted to at most 16 bits in the RGB space used in most image editing applications and output devices, RGB is inherently a restricted color model — it is a restricted color space that cannot describe all the colors that can be seen by the human eye.

Imagine the tonal variations available to you by working in 32-bit, floating point mode in the Beyond RGB color space, the basis of HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3. The Beyond RGB color space brings all the colors your eye can see to the task of creating your HDR photography image.

Because the 32-bit floating point Beyond RGB color model is not based on the RGB model, the brightness and contrast changes made to your image in HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 or 32 Float v3 will not alter your original colors as you would in an 8-bit or 16-bit program.

In fact, every tool and operation in HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3 always works in the high-precision 32-bit floating point mode. This is why many pro photographers are using HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3 to perform non-color-destructive brightness, contrast and color adjustments to their non-HDR images. These pros create their images from RAW camera files and save out their files in 32-bit format as a base reference file before moving on to Photoshop or other programs for further editing. Why lose data before you have to? Why lose data at all?

It’s time for you to try HDR imaging and discover the beauty in a high dynamic range image and then working with that image in full, non-destructive 32-bit floating point mode. Download a free, 30-day trial version of HDR Expose 3 or HDR Express 2 today and experience the beauty of true HDR photography.

Sep 032014
 

“A key next step toward making high dynamic range imagery, or HDR, available to consumers, will be made next week. Global standards body the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers plans to publish a technical standard that will assist in creating a consistent way for Hollywood to produce HDR-supported content for distribution on TVs, mobile devices or in the cinema, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.”

Read full article in The Hollywood Reporter by clicking the image below:

hollywood_a_p

Aug 252014
 

 Our friend Blake Rudis has created an excellent review of Topaz Labs Remask!

httpvh://youtu.be/7B94zeaPmwU

EverydayHDR
Aug 182014
 

“At first glance, Takehito Miyatake’s photos of magical firefly trails, glowing forests, and the eruptions of the Sakurajima volcano in Japan call to mind a long-forgotten childlike sense of wonder. However, further consideration of the Japanese photographer’s work reveals his profound reverence for the power of nature and a confident, lyrical use of light that is more often found in painting than in photography. It is no wonder then that two of Miyatake’s foremost influences are waka, a classical form of Japanese poetry, and the devastating Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami of 2011. Waka poems, written in thirty-one syllables, arranged in five lines, of 5/7/5/7/7 syllables respectively, are meant to be a concise expressions of the human heart’s response to nature.”

“Miyatake considers his work to be similar in form, “snapshots” of the forces that have both shaped and destroyed the country he grew up in. TIME Associate Photo Editor Mia Tramz interviews the 2014 Nikkei National Geographic Photo Grand Prize winner.”

To view full article please click the link below:
lightbox

takehito-miyatake-04

Aug 132014
 

Just in case you missed your chance when onOne Software ran this deal the first time a few months back, the company is yet again giving away its Perfect Effects 8 Premium Edition software, usually $100, completely free in exchange for your email. Part of Perfect Photo Suite 8, Perfect Effect 8 is usually used alongside a RAW image editor like Lightroom. Because while there are a few basic editing options in there, the main draw of Perfect Effects is… well… the effects. More specifically: the presets. The premium edition offers 23 groups of presets, with more than 100 different presets total.

To view full article please click the link below:

PETAPIXEL

onOnePerfect_2

Aug 102014
 

“I recently transitioned to Final Cut Pro X, because I had to edit 5K RAW footage and I spent many hours learning its unusual editing method. Right now I’m facing a different option. DaVinci Resolve is both my favourite color grading software as well as a very capable and reliable tool that can easily handle 5K RAW. I’m convinced I’m not the only editor who is slowly letting go of Final Cut 7 and intrigued by the idea of using DaVinci Resolve 11 as an NLE.

One of the most intriguing facts is that DaVinci Resolve is not only very professional, but the Lite version of the software is also very free, with some limitations (resolution only up to 3840×2160) that those who can’t afford the full version can usually live without. If you need the full version you will soon be able to get it here.”

To view full article please click the link below:

cinema5d

httpvh://youtu.be/OtNt8qL6P5g

Aug 092014
 

During August 13-31, we’re running a 50% promotion on Topaz Adjust.

Adjust is an image enhancement plug-in designed to make your photos pop.

The 50% coupon code is: augadjust

You can create stunning images with dramatic contrast, incredible detail and vibrant color with award-winning Adjust. Preset options range from subtle, realistic enhancements to artistic HDR-like presets. In just a few clicks, it’s easy to produce a truly eye-catching look in a single image.

httpvh://youtu.be/pW-G3M4xros

Buy Topaz Adjust Now

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Aug 082014
 

“It seems pretty clear that smartphones have become the point-and-shoots of our time.  The latest smartphone cams on the market have resolutions up to 41 megapixels, well more than the 10Mp of my old Canon PowerShot S90.  Even the average top-end smartphone sports a lens that delivers at least 16Mp.”

“So, other than driving the point-and-shoot guys out of business, what have they achieved, these super-cam smartphones?  Well, a lot, and they’re going to do more.”

“Now, 16Mp will support any format of the new 4K displays, which have roughly 4,000 pixels along the horizontal edge.  In fact, depending on the standard, they can vary from 3,840 to 5,120, and have anywhere from ~7Mp up to ~16.3Mp total, but the standard for ultra high definition television (UHDTV) uses just a bit more than 8Mp.”

To view full article please click the link below:

FORBES

Hanchard-Goodwin

Aug 072014
 

“What’s a photograph? If you answered: “a moment in time captured on film or as a digital image” your answer would only be right for the last hundred years or so. Back in 1839, when the Daguerreotype process was announced to the world, an exposure on a glass positive would take 20-30 minutes. When, two years later, Henry Fox Talbot introduced his calotype method of creating a film negative, the exposures were shorter, but still measured in minutes, not seconds or fractions of a second.”

“So, with either method, what was captured was the accreation of time stacked, chemical reaction by chemical reaction, on an exposed plate. Early photographs are a hearty slice of time, not a unique, frozen sliver. The images they catch never really existed as we see them now. They are collapsed movies.”

To view full article please click the link below:

RABBLE

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