Apr 202015
 

Sony has revealed that contrary to early expectations, two series of its imminent 2015 4K TV range will be capable of playing high dynamic range (HDR) content.

The XBR X930C and X940C TV ranges, due to launch in May, will both offer compatibility with HDR’s enhanced luminance range. The feature won’t be available from the TVs’ launch, though – instead it will be added via a firmware update ‘this summer’.

At this year’s CES in January and then again at a launch event in the UK in February Sony originally implied that we’d have to wait for all-new sets in the second half of the year to deliver HDR compatibility. Clearly, though, Sony has come to believe that the X930C and X940C models (the ultra-slim X900 models are apparently not going to get the HDR treatment) have the picture quality muscle to deliver HDR’s spectacular impact.

The key to this lies in Sony’s X-Tended Dynamic Range technology, which manipulates the way power and light are distributed around the screen to boost bright areas and deepen black level response.

Neil King, Head of Home Entertainment for Sony UK and Ireland, has this to say about the HDR news: “Sony has always been the leader in 4K and our exclusive Sony technologies have been at the core of providing TV lovers with the best picture quality, no matter what content they are watching. Our decades of experience allow us to introduce merging industry standard HDR to our 4K Ultra HD TV series and to reinforce contrast thanks to Sony’s unique technology X-tended Dynamic Range PRO”.

While on the surface the addition of HDR to Sony’s imminent range seems like a welcome development, though – especially as it means there will be some competition for Samsung’s JS9500 (reviewed here) and JS9000 (reviewed here) HDR TVs – it has to be said that Sony’s announcement is rather light on detail.

In particular, there’s no word on exactly what HDR formats will be supported. You could argue that this is hardly Sony’s fault, as the AV industry still hasn’t fully defined HDR (though a trio of standards have been announced for the upcoming Ultra HD Blu-ray discs). But since Sony also offers no clarity on exactly what brightness levels or colour range the X930C and X940C TVs may be capable of delivering, simply saying the sets will be HDR compatible is pretty much as vague as it gets.

Read more:

Forbes

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Feb 022015
 

The latest buzz in the Sony and Canon rumor mills is that the next round of high megapixel sensors for both companies, will be produced through a joint venture.imageAccording to the report, published both on Canon Watch and Canon Rumors, the new 50MP sensors that we have been hearing so much about from Canon and Sony, are actually the same sensor. The rumor states that by way of a patent share, Canon would get the benefit of Sony’s sensor design and Sony would get the advantage of Canon’s Dual Pixel AF, the resulting 50MP sensor would be used in both companies’ high megapixel bodies.

I don’t know about you, but that sounds like the best of both worlds. If you are a Canon shooter, you get a HUGE increase in dynamic range and sensor quality, while retaining the awesome abilities of the Dual Pixel AF. If you are a Sony shooter, you gain the advanced AF ability of the Dual Pixel AF (something we know many mirrorless offerings still struggle with), while maintaining your superb sensor performance.

Read More:

slrlounge

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Nov 282014
 

sony-a7II-front

Wednesday, the Sony A7 II was officially announced in the US. Since we already have all the spec details, the biggest mystery here was availability and pricing, both of which have finally been announced.

For those of you who need a refresher, the A7 II has some pretty major upgrades over the original Sony a7. The biggest being the addition of 5-axis IBIS (In Body Image Stabilization) capable of up to 4.5 stops of stabilization. The AF is also 30% faster and should track subjects much better than the original. Full A7II specs and details below:

Sony A7 II Specs

  • 24.3MP Full-Frame Exmor CMOS Sensor
  • BIONZ X Image Processor
  • 5-Axis SteadyShot INSIDE Stabilization
  • Enhanced Fast Hybrid AF and 5 fps Burst
  • Full HD XAVC S Video and S-Log2 Gamma
  • 3.0″ 1,228.8k-Dot Tilting LCD Monitor
  • XGA 2.36M-Dot OLED Electronic Viewfinder
  • Weather-Resistant Magnesium Alloy Body
  • Refined Grip & Robust Lens Mount
  • Built-In Wi-Fi Connectivity with NFC

For more info please click the link below:

slrlounge

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Pre Order Now

isoa7m2

Nov 142014
 

The 1.5″ sensor records 6K video (6144 x 2160 according to the leak at Chinese site CNBeta via Image Sensors World) and only requires 4.85MP, meaning the pixels themselves are massive – almost 10 µm in width compares to 8.4 µm for the Sony A7S, 5.2 µm for the 5D Mark III. However unlike the traditionally square photosites on bayer sensors, the Sony APCS pixels are rectangular, measuring 9.78 x 4.89 µm (micrometers). More at EOSHD

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Sep 272014
 

When the Panasonic FZ-1000 was announced, it was obvious to everybody that Panasonic was going for the Sony RX20′s jugular… metaphorically speaking. It was cheaper, could shoot 4K and had a longer (albeit darker) lens.

Well, it seems Sony is ready to fight back, and soon, with a 4K-capable RX20.

The rumor broke over on Sony Alpha Rumors, who was told by an anonymous source that the RX20 would use the same 20.1MP sensor and 24-200mm f/2.8 lens as the RX10, but feature 4K video, 120fps capability at 720p and the ability to shoot the XAVC-S codec.

According to this source, the camera will be announced in mid-October for $1,300 USD — what the RX10 originally cost before the price dropped to $1,000 post-Panasonic FZ-1000 release — while the original RX10 will remain on the market after an additional $100-$200 price drop.

For more info please click the link below:

petapixel

rx10

 

 

Sep 192014
 

Since Sony dropped the A7 on us a little while back, it and all its variants have entered our consciousness and headlines the photo-world over, and surprisingly, stayed there. There’s been much whispering about what the successor to this platform/game changer is going to be, and when it would materialize, and even though it’s been getting louder, it doesn’t seem to dissuade anyone from buying them.

Many pros I know with complete platforms for either Nikon or Canon have made the switch, with more in tow. There’s a huge part of me that wants to do the same, so it figures then that Sony’s announcement of a beautiful Zeiss 16-35 f4 Full Frame E-mount lens is about the most enticing piece of kit to spawn for me from recent news. It seems, however, I’m in good and plentiful company, as apparently it’s been flying off the pre-order ‘shelves’ since it was announced two days ago.

To view full article please click the link below:

slrlounge

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Sep 172014
 

httpvh://youtu.be/V-phxWVlk6M

May 142013
 

httpvh://youtu.be/3nJxRZji6w4

It is not surprising that  a huge amount of money has been invested in sensors for mobile phone cameras. My research indicates that Sony has spent about two billion dollars in R & D to develop the Exmor RS series of HDR sensors. The way they work is quite logical. Where conventional Bayer sensors are comprised of a single layer of pixels, the Exmor RS sensors are comprised of three layers. Each layer is sensitive to a different level of brightness. So the camera basically captures and combines three bracketed images during a single exposure. This HDR capture also works for HD video capture. Exmor RS also incorporates back illuminated sensor technology which moves the wiring behind the photo-diode for increased sensitivity.

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The new Sony Experia Z uses a 1/3 inch 13 megapixel version of this sensor. By the end of this year we may very likely a much larger 20 megapixel Sony Exmor Sensor in the “Sony Honami” smart phone. It seems to me that if this sensor is scaled up, we may find a future variation in a professional DSLR. I would love to be able to avoid motion artifacts in my HDR images using this technology!

Sony Xperia

 

 

Is this the Sony Exmor RS “Honami”?

 

Sony i1 aka Honami cameraphone to land unlocked in the US this fall, alongside the 6.44″ Togari phablet

More On The Sony Honami And Its 20-Megapixel Camera | Ubergizmo

Mar 042013
 

httpvh://youtu.be/viE6LcrlwiQ

My understanding is that Sony spent a billion dollars developing this new three layered sensor. Each layer is sensitive to a different portion of the dynamic range of a scene. Those of you who remember the history of color photography know that there is a striking analogy here. The first three color motion picture process by Technicolor used a three strip film camera to capture the RGB color information. In 1935 Kodak invented something called integal tripack color film. It was named “Kodachrome”. The new film recorded RGB information on three layers coated onto the film base. Subsequent color films all used integral tripack  to capture color information.

With Bayer sensors in digital cameras, RGB info is captured in one layer with some limitations on dynamic range. By devising a three layer, Bayer sensor Sony is increasing the ability of this sensor to capture a wider dynamic range. Eventually I predict that there will be larger sensors of this type for our DSLRs that will probably eliminate are at least reduce the need to shoot multiple exposures in HDR photography. Thanks Sony!

Aug 202012
 

I have been hearing about these new stacked CMOS Sony sensors for a while now. They will be released in October and so don’t expect to see them in the iPhone 5. The key advantage is that the three layered sensors would be capable of HDR capture in one exposure for still photography.  HDR High Definition video is a key feature.

Sony’s New HDR Video Capable Sensors Could Make Your Next iPhone Picture Perfect

Jun 222012
 

Sony pumps $994 million into building stacked CMOS that lets smartphones record HDR Video — Engadget

TVTechnology: Sony Sinks Nearly $1 Billion Into HDR-Capable Stacked CMOS Sensors

Sony increases production capacity for stacked CMOS image sensors

– Increasing total production capacity for image sensors to approximately 60,000 wafers per month to supply image sensors mainly for smartphones –
June 22, 2012, Tokyo, Japan – Sony Corporation (“Sony”) today announced that it plans to invest in Sony Semiconductor Corporation’s Nagasaki Technology Center (“Nagasaki TEC”) from the first half of the fiscal year ending March 31, 2013 through the first half of the fiscal year ending March 31, 2014, to increase the production capacity for stacked CMOS image sensors.*1

This investment is intended to provide for new wafer processing equipment for stacked CMOS image sensors, and to increase and transform wafer lines capable of manufacturing CMOS image sensors.
With this development, Sony plans to increase total production capacity for CCD and CMOS image sensors to approximately 60,000 wafers per month by the end of September 2013.*2

In light of the rapidly expanding demand for smartphones and tablets, Sony plans to continue to solidify its leading global position in CMOS image sensors by strengthening its production capabilities for stacked CMOS image sensors, which provide greater performance in a more compact form. Furthermore, Sony intends to accelerate its growth strategy by incorporating superior core technologies, including stacked CMOS image sensors, into a wide range of products for its digital imaging and mobile businesses, which are priorities within its electronics business.

The investment amount is approximately 80 billion yen, of which, the amount to be invested in the current fiscal year ending March 31, 2013 (approximately 45 billion yen) was included in the forecast of the capital expenditures for semiconductors in the current fiscal year announced at the annual earnings release on May 10, 2012. In addition, Sony will utilize a governmental subsidy in its investment plan which will be provided by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry in Japan, through the “Subsidy for Domestic Location Promotion Projects” program.