Leica Announces the M10 by Adam Ottke

 Gear  Comments Off on Leica Announces the M10 by Adam Ottke
Jan 212017
 

The Leica M10 is the latest iteration of digital German rangefinders. The M10 features a similar 24MP CMOS sensor to that of the M-P (Typ 240), expanded ISO performance from ISO 100-50,000, an improved viewfinder, new three-button back panel design, and more for a discount over the Typ 240.

At $6,595, the M10 is nearly 10 percent cheaper than the Typ 240 and offers better performance across the board. A new 0.73x viewfinder offers a 30-percent larger field of view and 50-percent increased eye relief. The menu system is designed to be controlled with a joystick and just three buttons: Play, Live View, and Menu. Meanwhile, a dedicated ISO dial offers automatic or manual selection from through the native range of ISO 100-6,400. A Leica Maestro II image processor allows for five-frame-per-second shooting.

Read More:

fstoppers

~

Fuji Announces X100F and X-T20 Cameras, Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 R WR Lens, and GFX 50S Full Specs, All With Preorders, by Alex Cooke

 Gear  Comments Off on Fuji Announces X100F and X-T20 Cameras, Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 R WR Lens, and GFX 50S Full Specs, All With Preorders, by Alex Cooke
Jan 212017
 

Well, it’s quite a day to be a Fuji fan! The company has announced two new camera bodies, a new lens, and the full specifications for their upcoming mirrorless medium format camera.

X100F Camera

The X100F is the next iteration of the X100 series of cameras. I personally still use my X100S and love it. Check out the X100F’s full specs:

  • 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor
  • 23mm f/2 lens
  • Advanced hybrid viewfinder
  • User-adjustable magnification in rangefinder mode for improved focusing accuracy
  • 60 fps electronic viewfinder
  • Realtime parallax correction
  • Improved performance times, including 0.5-second startup time, 0.2-second shooting interval, 0.01-second shutter lag, and AF speed as fast as 0.08 seconds
  • 91 AF points, with 40% of the imaging area covered by phase detection points
  • New ACROS film simulation with optional grain simulation (available on all simulations)
  • Built-in ISO dial
  • Built-in three-stop ND filter
  • Electronic shutter with speeds up to 1/32,000 s
  • Digital teleconverter option with 50mm and 70mm-equivalent angles of view
  • Interval shooting with unlimited frames
  • Wi-Fi control

Read More:

fstoppers

~

The Hardware of the Panasonic GH5 – An Interview with Panasonic’s M. Uematsu by: Fabian Chaundy

 Gear, News  Comments Off on The Hardware of the Panasonic GH5 – An Interview with Panasonic’s M. Uematsu by: Fabian Chaundy
Jan 082017
 

With the expected shipping date for the Panasonic GH5 just over the horizon (here’s our detailed feature GH5 hands-on post from earlier today), we thought it would be a good time to catch up with Panasonic’s M. Uematsu to chat about some of the more technical aspects of the next member of the popular GH line of mirrorless cameras. Check out our interview at cinema5D HQ… shot, of course, on the Panasonic GH5.

We all know how much of a cut-throat business the camera world is, with manufacturers constantly trying to one-up one another in a constant and quick succession of new camera releases. As the first big camera release of 2017, the Panasonic GH5 aims to come out swinging, promising to bring a host of truly nice features for indie filmmakers. And about time, too, as after almost 3 years, the popular GH4 was slowly starting to lag behind next to the competition.

But before diving into the great features that the GH5 will bring in a couple of months, we first wanted to know why Panasonic didn’t decide to go all out with some much-requested bells and whistles, especially given its popularity among filmmakers both amateur and professional. So, Panasonic, why didn’t you include internal ND filters and RAW recording?

Read More:

cinema5D

~

The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit – a Removable Dual-Lens System for the iPhone 7 Plus By: Fabian Chaundy

 Gear  Comments Off on The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit – a Removable Dual-Lens System for the iPhone 7 Plus By: Fabian Chaundy
Dec 112016
 

The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit is a new, third-party dual-lens system for the iPhone 7 Plus. It features a sleek and slim design that makes it unobtrusive and quick to use.

Smartphone filmmaking is certainly a thing these days. Modern smartphones feature decent cameras that can be used in conjunction with a variety of apps, stabilisers and other accessories to produce very high quality content. Just take a look at this short film shot simultaneously on an iPhone 7 and a RED Weapon for the kind of end result you can achieve. By the way, if you want to learn more about iPhone filmmaking, make sure you check out this excellent article by cinema5D’s Richard Lackey.
One of the limitations you may find on your journey as an iPhone cinematographer is your camera’s lens. Camera accessory manufacturer Kamerar has announced a product that promises to help you achieve more interesting images: it’s the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit for the iPhone 7 Plus.

The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit

The main difference to other third-party lens options out there is how seamlessly it integrates with your iPhone 7 Plus. The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit is based around an actual functional protective phone cover with access to all ports, meaning that you don’t have to whip out lens mounts whenever inspiration strikes and you change from phone mode to shooting mode.

 

The back of the case features a slot in which to insert the different dual-lens setups, allowing you to quickly flip up the optics when you want to change your field of view and optical characteristics. This removes the need to screw and unscrew different lenses, and helps you save time when trying to get that unexpected shot.
Kamerar claims their removable dual-lens system for the dual camera on the iPhone 7 Plus is the first in the world, and this does in fact seem to be the case, as other third-party offerings only appear to make use of one of the cameras.

Read More:

cinema5d

~

Olympus OMD E-M1 II controls and handling for video – a first look

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on Olympus OMD E-M1 II controls and handling for video – a first look
Dec 062016
 

The new flagship Olympus OMD E-M1 II has been getting quite a lot of attention lately thanks to its amazing image stabilisation capabilities and high bitrate internal DCI 4K recording. We’ve just received the highly specced Micro 4/3rds camera to test and will be taking a closer look at it over the coming days.

In this first article I’m going to look at the design and handling of the camera for video. In later articles we’ll examine the image stabilisation system, autofocus and image quality. Bitrates, crops and colour settings will have to wait till then. (spolier – there is no Log profile on the camera)

The camera body is nicely put together.

The body of the camera is nicely put together and is weather sealed. There is a good sized handgrip that felt good in my hands.

The LCD screen is a flip-out type similar to cameras like the GH4. You can angle it up, down or a full 180 degrees around for selfies – video bloggers will be happy. The electronic viewfinder has a 120 hz refresh rate and is very good, with little noticable lag or image judder. There is a histogram function, peaking and also focus magnification. These all work well, but the one major annoyance is that the magnification function doesn’t work while recording – unlike the competing Sony a7 and a6xxx series.

Read More:

newshooter

 

Kinotehnik Practilite 600 — Portable LED Lighting for $799, By Graham Sheldon

 Gear  Comments Off on Kinotehnik Practilite 600 — Portable LED Lighting for $799, By Graham Sheldon
Nov 302016
 

The Kinotehnik Practilite 600 recently announced by the film accessory manufacturer is a portable, smartphone-controlled LED with a promised output similar to a 300-450 watt Tungsten light. This new addition to their Practilite line will be shipping and available soon, so read on for all the specs including pricing and availability.

LED technology has been improving dramatically over the years. Gone are the days of green tinged color output and individual diodes burning out because of poor quality control. The struggle these days, however, is creating high-output LED lights at a price point that makes sense. The Practilite 600 comes in with a price tag of $799, double the price of a comparable output tungsten light, but significantly more affordable than LED lights of years past.
Other budget LED fresnel lights on the market:
CAME TV CE-1500WS LED Video Spotlight $338.95
Dracast Fresnel 200 Daylight LED Light $493.50
The Kinotehnik Practilite 600 promises an equivalent output to a 300-450 watt tungsten unit, which for me personally places this light in background light, hair light or fill light territory — not necessarily for a key light. Despite being cheaper than the Practilite 602, the 600 has an output 20% higher in flood mode according to the manufacturer.

For more on the first member of the Practilite line read Johnnie Behiri’s minute review of the Practilite 602 HERE.
The benefits of LED lighting lie in power consumption and heat output. You can plug multiple LED lights into household circuits and not worry about blowing a breaker. In the tungsten world, you are out of luck with anything larger than a 1K light, maybe 2K in some instances, inside a home. Not to mention that with tungsten lighting there is always that tiny chance of someone getting burned. Not so with LEDs.

Read More:

cinema5d

Fstoppers Reviews the New Best Portrait Lens, the Nikon 105mm f/1.4, By Quentin Decaillet

 Gear  Comments Off on Fstoppers Reviews the New Best Portrait Lens, the Nikon 105mm f/1.4, By Quentin Decaillet
Nov 302016
 

Canon has always been known for its fabulous portraits lenses: the 85mm f/1.2 and the 135mm f/2. I used to own and love both of them, with a preference for the first. When I bought into the Nikon system, I was afraid I would miss these two optics. But truth be told, the Nikon 85mm f/1.4 is at least as good as its Canon equivalent if not better! Regarding the 135mm, that’s a whole different story as the Nikon’s is quite old now. However, they recently announced the 105mm f/1.4, and I had the chance to put my hands on it for a few weeks! Let’s see how it compares with other portrait lenses and if it could potentially replace a 135mm.
Many people regarded the 105mm f/1.4 announcement as very bizarre. The new portrait lens is not extremely different from the 85mm in terms of focal length and most people probably expected a 135mm replacement instead. Nonetheless, the 105mm in itself is an interesting focal length for many uses, especially for someone who owns a 58mm even though they don’t share the same image quality or look at all.

Build Quality
When taking the lens in your hands for the first time, you immediately notice its weight and size. It’s not small by any means. For someone used to the Canon 85mm f/1.2, it’s nothing very surprising, but for Nikon users, it might feel beefy.

Canon 5DII with 85mm f/1.2 vs. Nikon D810 with 105mm f/1.4

Canon 5DII with 85mm f/1.2 on the left and Nikon D810 with 105mm f/1.4 on the right

Read More:

fstoppers

 

Sony RX100V & Sony A6500 Hands-On Video – Rolling Shutter & Overheating Solved?

 Gear  Comments Off on Sony RX100V & Sony A6500 Hands-On Video – Rolling Shutter & Overheating Solved?
Oct 182016
 

Yesterday’s press event at Sony’s European headquarters was very informative. We were given the possibility to record with the new RX100V but not with the a6500 as this camera was not yet ready for primetime, although we did get a A6500 Hands-On too.

Here are, in short, the new features that these cameras have to offer:

On both cameras: 

  • The Sony RX100V and Sony a6500 both share the same BIONZ X image processor and front-end LSI chip as the new Sony a99II, which allows for high volumes of data to be processed.
  • The buffer has been increased, which allows for capture of more photos per second and longer slow-motion videos.

Sony RX100V – Better rolling shutter effect control

Sony RX100V: 

  • Video image quality has been slightly improved.
  • Rolling shutter effect has been greatly improved because of better processing.
  • Autofocus is now faster and more accurate than before.
  • Photo mode allows up to six seconds of 24fps in RAW, theoretically allowing to create short 5.5K video clips.
  • New underwater housing (Marine pack MPK-URX100A, up to 40m/130ft).

Read More:

cinema5d

~

Why Fuji’s New Medium Format Camera Is Important

 Gear  Comments Off on Why Fuji’s New Medium Format Camera Is Important
Sep 302016
 

Since the days of film, medium format has been far from reach for many photographers. Even working professionals can have trouble justifying the high price point of these systems: when used, they can be $8,000-10,000. Medium format film bodies, while cheap now, were always several thousand away from even the most exorbitantly priced 35mm bodies. Factor in the inconvenient size of just about every medium format camera ever, and it’s easy to put the idea of working with these monsters far from mind.

The Fuji GFX 50s

The world of digital photography is ever-evolving, however, and just a few short months ago, Hassleblad announced what could be a solution to these issues, the X1D. While certainly intrigued by what that brings to the table, I believe the future of medium format lies with Fuji. Fuji’s new camera has this name for a reason. G refers to their medium format heritage, F for their heritage in film and the popular film simulations offered on the camera, and X because well, it’s a giant X-T2. The GFX 50s has been rumored for quite a while. I recall personally having seen small rumors here and there over a year ago. To much hype, Fuji finally decided to unleash it on the world this year at Photokina. Fuji did not disappoint. The 50s has an impressive list of specifications, many of which will be familiar to current Fuji shooters, some of which are standard in the world of medium format. What has me so excited is how Fuji is marketing this camera directly at DSLR shooters. I say this for several reasons, the first of which is the size. The 50s is nearly identical in size to the D810 and 5D Mark IV, but with a sensor 1.7x larger than full frame. With the vertical grip that Fuji announced, it may be slightly larger, but the point is that the size and feel won’t be foreign to full-frame shooters. The camera can also shoot tethered, which most medium format users are used to, the 50s also has more physical controls on the exterior (like a DSLR), rather than the sparse bodies and extremely menu-driven operation of many current medium format platforms. There is also no X-Trans sensor, which could be good or bad depending on who you are and how you feel about Fuji’s other options. Essentially, the X-Trans sensor uses a randomized pattern for the color pixels rather than the standard RGB order in traditional Bayer array sensors like those found in Nikon, Canon, and Sony cameras. X-Trans is what has always given the Fuji cameras their distinct look and color, but it has also caused many issues with raw converters like Adobe Lightroom, as the information is a little more difficult for the software to decipher. In what seems to be more seamless integration into existing workflows, the 50s has forgone an X-Trans in favor of a traditional Bayer array sensor. Being such a massive sensor, the difference, other than better file-handling in post, is likely negligible.

Read More:

fstoppers.com

~

The GoPro Hero5 Black: Waterproof, Stabilized, Voice Commands & More

 Action cams, Gear  Comments Off on The GoPro Hero5 Black: Waterproof, Stabilized, Voice Commands & More
Sep 212016
 

hero5black_feat

GoPro is calling the new Hero 5 Black “Simply the best GoPro, ever.” They’re not wrong. Waterproof to 33ft out of the box and featuring 4K video, stabilization, voice commands, and more, the Hero 5 Black is a lot of action camera for $400.

This morning’s GoPro announcement was a product release bonanza. Not only did we get to see the Karma ‘so much more than a’ Drone, CEO Nick Woodman also debuted the new flagship GoPro Hero5 Black.

The big news on the surface is that the Hero5 Black can survive below the surface… of the water that is. Out of the box and without a casing of any kind, it’s waterproof to 10 meters (~33ft). This thanks to a new one-button design that takes away a lot of seams and looks pretty sleek doing it.

hero5black_front

hero5black_back

The second most ‘exciting’ bit of news about the Hero5 Black is the voice controls, which let you “stay in the moment” while capturing said moment. Available in 7 languages at launch, you can tell your Hero5 Black to start recording, take a photo, take a burst, and more.

Over and over during this morning’s release Woodman harped on the fact that GoPro’s goal was to make a camera that “disappears.” A camera that is so easy and intuitive to use that you forget you’re using a camera—an extension of your experience instead of something that interrupts it. Voice controls are a big piece of this.

Add to that the automatic upload to the cloud that comes with a GoPro Plus subscription—every time you plug in your GoPro to charge, it uploads automatically—and Woodman is getting closer to his “invisible” camera dream.

Here’s a quick into and an overview of “what’s new” with the Hero5:

Read More:

petapixel

~

Hands-On With the ZEISS LWZ.3 21-100mm T2.9 – T3.9

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on Hands-On With the ZEISS LWZ.3 21-100mm T2.9 – T3.9
Sep 152016
 

Here at IBC 2016, we go hands-on with the freshly announced Zeiss LWZ.3, the newest addition to their lightweight zoom range. Although the lens gets slower at the far end, from T2.9 down to T3.9, it might nevertheless be the next big thing for documentary work. Make sure to read Nino’s in-depth article for all about the details of this lightweight cine zoom lens. 

Hands-on with the Zeiss LWZ.3

As there is no such thing as the perfect lens (14 – 200mm T 1.5 with full frame coverage in a 1,2 kg parfocal lens for $800, anyone?) you’ll always get some downsides, that’s for sure. In the case of this lens, even though it is really lightweight for the focal range it covers, there are also some downsides to it. The Zeiss LWZ.3 only covers super35 sized sensors, for example. The bigger Zeiss Compact Zoom versions cover full frame, but they are double the price for half the focal range.

The one thing I find really annoying is the drop of T-stop towards the end of the focal range of this lens. But Zeiss has managed to implement a technology called gradiant T-Stop which will ensure very smooth and linear transition of aperture over the focal range.

Read More:

cinema5d

~

iPhone 7 and 7 Plus Announced: Dual Cameras for Zoom and Bokeh

 Apple  Comments Off on iPhone 7 and 7 Plus Announced: Dual Cameras for Zoom and Bokeh
Sep 092016
 

iphone7viewsfeat

Apple just announced the new iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus, a smartphone it calls “the world’s most advanced smartphone.”

The phones feature a new aluminum body that comes in shiny black, matte black, gold, silver, and rose gold.

Both phones are now officially water and dust resistant, boasting an IP67 protection standard that means your iPhone will be safe from splashes.

iPhone 7

The iPhone 7 has a new camera system that features optical image stabilization system that lets you shoot longer exposures while reducing shake, larger f/1.8 aperture that lets in 50% more light, a 6-element lens that delivers sharp images, a new 12-megapixel sensor that’s 60% faster and 30% more energy efficient.

iphone7features

The flash is a Quad-LED system that True Tone flash, 50% more light, and Flicker sensor that compensates for the flickering in artificial light. Here are a couple of sample photos shot using the new flash:

flash1

flash2

The image signal processor at the core of the phone has 2x the throughput compared to previous iPhones. It uses machine learning to detect objects and people. The system then sets exposure, focus, color, white balance, tone mapping, noise reduction, and multiple image compositing. Everything is done in 25 milliseconds.

Here are sample photographs shot using the iPhone 7:

A Guide To Sony’s Ridiculous 50mm Lens Selection

 Gear  Comments Off on A Guide To Sony’s Ridiculous 50mm Lens Selection
Aug 312016
 

Sony has created a few gems when it comes to lenses in the past few years, with the 90mm Macro and 16-35mm f/4 potentially being some of the best in their class. 50mm for some reason seems to be their favorite focal length to produce, seeing as they now have seven different “normal” lenses with the release of their new 50mm Macro this morning.

With over double the selection in this range of their closest competitor, Canon, it may be tough to choose exactly which one to go for. Whether you’re starting in the world of Sony with an a6000 or are a professional photographer with the most demanding clients, they have a 50mm(ish*) lens for you.

Sony FE 50mm f/1.8 

Starting with their cheapest offering, we have the “Nifty Fifty.” A full frame lens with a decent aperture of f/1.8 that’s extremely inexpensive. From my experience with the lens, it’s plenty sharp on the a7sII or a7II and a6000/a6300. On the a7RII, you might not be so thrilled, but a $250 lens isn’t likely to be stellar on a 42 megapixel sensor. The autofocus speed is simply alright. If you’re shooting portraits on single autofocus mode and you don’t need good tracking, you’ll be fine. With a $250 price tag, this lens is for the photographer on a budget or someone just getting their feet wet in the world of 50mm lenses.

Sony E 50mm f/1.8 OSS

At $299, this lens is also pretty inexpensive. For $50 dollars more, what are you getting? It’s also what you aren’t getting. This lens does not cover full frame. Image Stabilization and significantly better autofocus performance are the real benefits here. If you have an a6000 or a6300, this lens is great. If you also own an a7 or plan on it down the road, maybe hold off. Optically I would say the FE 50mm f/1.8 and the OSS version here are similar.

Sony FE 50mm f/2.8 Macro

A brand new addition to the lineup, this is Sony’s second full-frame macro lens. I have not used this lens (as it was announced this morning), but I would venture a guess that this will likely be a solid performer on all of the A7 series cameras, functioning as an excellent all around lens for macro, portraiture, and product work. On a crop sensor Sony, this is around a 75mm lens, perfect for portraits and studio work. If you like getting close, this is your lens. At $498, this is a reasonably priced lens with promising specs. Auto focus it is yet to be demonstrated so beware if good AF speed and accuracy is important to you, as macro lenses are typically underwhelming in this category.

Read More:

petapixel

~

Canon 5D Mark IV | This is It, Finally

 Gear  Comments Off on Canon 5D Mark IV | This is It, Finally
Aug 252016
 

So this is it; it’s finally here to clear up the speculation and put to bed the inaccuracies. I say that because this impending release has been grabbing blog copy and forum fodder for weeks, like a ghost that hangs around but never reveals itself. But here it is. Finally.

It’s hard to imagine a single Canon camera more anticipated than a new 5D, and this one maybe more so than the last because of Nikon’s comparatively big releases with the D500 and D5, and the leak about the 5D Mark IV with that one particular sticking point and marketing magic-soundbite: that Dual Pixel Raw (more on that further on). There’s much to say about the camera that’s in many ways a re-structuring from top to bottom, inside and out, but perhaps we’ll get into all of that in later discussion, and more when we get our hands on one to review in the very near future. So for now here’s the Cliff Notes…

The Canon 5D Mark IV is, though familiar in look and controls, a new animal. It has a new sensor, improved AF and metering sensors like the 150,000 pixel RGB+IR sensor that allows for better subject recognition and tracking; new processor; a built in GPS receiver for latitude, longitude and elevation; built-in WiFi and NFC connectivity, and all enclosed in a familiar but better sealed body. It’s an all ‘round update. Oh, and it also does 4k at 30FPS, has a 7FPS max shooting mode, touch screen, Dual Pixel CMOS AF, and the brand new party trick, Dual Pixel Raw. That is, the 5D Mark IV on the half shell.

PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS

30.4MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor
DIGIC 6+ Image Processor
3.2″ 1.62m-Dot Touchscreen LCD Monitor
DCI 4K Video at 30 fps; 8.8MP Still Grab
61-Point High Density Reticular AF
Native ISO 32000, Expanded to ISO 102400
Dual Pixel RAW; AF Area Select Button
Dual Pixel CMOS AF and Movie Servo AF
7 fps Shooting; CF & SD Card Slots
Built-In GPS and Wi-Fi with NFC

‘;

Read More:

slrlounge

~

Leica M Trade-Up Program May Be Best Time To Buy | Trade In Any Camera & Get An Additional $750

 Gear, Marketing, News  Comments Off on Leica M Trade-Up Program May Be Best Time To Buy | Trade In Any Camera & Get An Additional $750
Aug 212016
 

You’d be hard pressed to find a single photographer who doesn’t have a soft spot for Leica; who doesn’t want a Leica body with a few lenses, even if not for their day-to-day work. The inhibiting factor is, of course, price. The ‘golden’ glove feel of a Leica with all its history behind it doesn’t come cheap, but the Red Dot company is offering a hand to help out in this way at the moment, with their trade-in and M upgrade program.

The M, even amidst the release of the SL, is the quintessential Leica and benchmark rangefinder, and through September 30th, you can trade up from any camera at a Leica Store, boutique, or dealer and receive a $750 cheque after your new M is registered. That means you get your camera’s trade-in value and the $750, with the only exclusions being the Leica M-D (Typ 262) and Leica M (Typ 262).

The process is quite simple, as you bring/send in the camera you’re looking to trade in, it’s appraised and given a valuation which is then put towards the purchase of the new M, and once the new M is registered your cheque is in the mail. You can call any Leica Store for more details and they’ll walk you through the process. It’s extremely rare that Leica offers any kind of financial incentive for their current line-up of cameras, so if you were thinking about Leica ownership, this would seem a great time.

Read More:

slrlounge

~

 

Kipon Adapter Puts Medium Format Lenses Onto Sony A7 | Keep Angle Of View & Gain 1 Stop Speed

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on Kipon Adapter Puts Medium Format Lenses Onto Sony A7 | Keep Angle Of View & Gain 1 Stop Speed
Aug 092016
 

Top quality and top prices are typically associated with Medium Format lenses, which only adds to their appeal. Medium format lenses are generally regarded favorably for their build quality and how they deliver contrast, saturation, the quality of the bokeh, and how they deal with certain light abnormalities. And now, thanks to Kipon Baveyes (a brand under the umbrella of Shanghai Transvision working with German IB/E Optics), Hasselblad V-Mount optics can now be adapted to work with the Sony A7, Leica SL, and Leica M mount cameras.

When Metabones released their first Speed Booster focal reducer some years ago now, who would’ve guessed they’d be setting off a trend in the way they did. But as with all good ideas, when they hit they take off, and photographers bought them in spades, and of course other manufacturers caught on. This though, is the first time MF lenses will be able to be used on these full frame cameras.

Read More:

slrlounge

~

How the Fujifilm X-Pro2 Was Designed for ‘Decisive Usability’

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on How the Fujifilm X-Pro2 Was Designed for ‘Decisive Usability’
Aug 032016
 

download

Digital cameras are notoriously difficult to design and get right. Where do you start? Who is the customer? What features do you include on the camera? There are uncountable ways to approach a camera development and design program.

For example, you can create a spreadsheet listing current and near-future ‘must-have’ specifications and cross them out one-by-one to please the techno-consumer. Or you can specialize and excel in specific areas—a more difficult proposition altogether. For the X-Pro2, Fujifilm chose the latter simply because of their heritage of crafting cameras for particular needs.

If you take a look at Fujifilm’s history of cameras, you get a sense of a company that sees photography not only as a technological endeavor but also an artistic one. For example, I have in the past used two remarkable Fujifilm cameras — the GX680 III and the GA645. The GX680 III is the largest SLR ever made. It’s a very specialized camera catering to product, interior and architectural photography. The superb Fujinon EBC lenses were attached to a front standard that in turn connected to the camera body with bellows. This enabled not only close-up shots with any lens but also enabled the front standard to have view camera movements — rise/fall, tilt, shift and swing. With this combination, you could shoot a small product that was completely in focus, as well as photograph interior and exterior architecture while correcting for converging parallels. It shot a rare 6 x 8 cm image on medium format film, which is close to magazine page proportions in order to minimize cropping.

Photo of the Fuji GX680III by Viaissimo. CC BY-SA 3.0.

Read More:

petapixel

~

DJI Announce the First Drone Zoom Camera – Zenmuse Z3

 Action cams, Gear  Comments Off on DJI Announce the First Drone Zoom Camera – Zenmuse Z3
Jul 142016
 

DJI just announced the introduction of a drone zoom camera called the DJI Zenmuse Z3. It is an upgrade to the popular Zenmuse X3, which is their entry level integrated drone camera used on the DJI Inspire 1 and DJI Osmo.

The Zenmuse Z3 will offer a zoom of up to 7x. That is a 3.5x optical zoom with a digital scaler doing the rest. Although the press release indicates this zoom camera is aimed mainly at industrial applications such as inspection and surveying, it certainly also gives filmmakers interesting new possibilities. A different focal length can come in handy in many filming situations.

Read More:

cinema5d

~

Opinion: Could Panasonic launch a full frame GH5?

 Cinematography, Gear, Technique  Comments Off on Opinion: Could Panasonic launch a full frame GH5?
Jul 032016
 
The launch of the Leica SL has led many to believe that Panasonic could be about to launch a full frame CSC with 4K video. But is that really a possibility?

The announcement of the Leica SL has led some to speculate that Panasonic will announce a full-frame compact system camera, but is there any evidence that this could happen?

It’s no secret that Panasonic and Leica have a good working relationship. Panasonic designs, manufactures and tests Micro Four Thirds lenses to quality standards that ensure Leica is then happy to wear the iconic red dot badge. And in return, Leica re-badges and tweaks Panasonic compact and bridge cameras as Leica models. Somewhere in between there’s obviously an exchange of ideas and information, but does this mean Panasonic will follow suit and announce it’s own full-frame CSC?

Read More:

thevideomode.com

~

Zeiss Introduces the Upgraded VR One Plus Headset

 Gear  Comments Off on Zeiss Introduces the Upgraded VR One Plus Headset
Jun 282016
 

The new VR One Plus headset from Zeiss builds upon their previous model, the VR One, by adding a few key features to make it even more user-friendly at an affordable price.

We have been covering the VR craze incessantly in the past few months. It was one of the hot topics at NAB, and as we have seen, many filmmakers are already embracing the new technology.

What will undoubtedly determine whether VR goes the way of 3D, however, is the ease of access that consumers and audiences require to view the content. True, you can just tap or click your way around a Facebook VR video environment, but what really makes this content come to life is the experience through a headset of some kind.

Read More:

cinema5d

~