Canon 5D Mark IV vs Nikon D810 vs Sony A7R II: Side-by-Side Comparison

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Jan 012017
 

If you’re in the market for a high-end full-frame camera, chances are good the Canon 5D Mark IV, Sony A7R II, and Nikon D810 are all contenders. Check out this side-by-side comparison if you’re having a hard time deciding which of the three is best for you.

This comparison was put together by JP Morgan over at The Slanted Lens, who enlisted the help of Kenneth Merrill to put all three of these cameras through their paces using native glass. They tested image quality, autofocus accuracy and tracking, dynamic range, and high ISO/low light performance to see where each camera excelled, or if there’s even a noticeable difference.

You should definitely check out the full video to see the comparison tests and judge the results for yourself, but if you’re in a hurry, you can read our summary below.

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Image Quality

Canon really fell short here, but then again it’s also the lowest resolution camera of the bunch at just 30.4MP compared to Nikon’s 36.3MP and Sony’s 42MP. Both the Nikon and Sony came out very sharp, but each exposed the scene a little differently, and the lower res Nikon seems to have generated the highest quality image.

Autofocus

Sony won tracking hands down thanks to the plethora of AF points going all the way to the edge of the sensor and its nifty Face Detection mode. As far as accuracy, Nikon seems to hit the mark more accurately than Canon (the Sony had to sit this test out).

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Jul 292015
 

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Last month, I took the Nikon D810 out on the Sierra High Route — one of the toughest adventures around. It got dirty, wet, and constantly banged around. Here’s how it performed.

Three years ago, my roommate bought a D800E. I’ve always shot Canon, but he let me borrow his Nikon for a couple of shoots. It was impressive to say the least. I vowed that when it was time for me to upgrade from my 5D Mk II, if Canon hadn’t released a comparable body, that I would give the D800 a shot.

Fast forward to this past April. While riding a $450 motorcycle through Vietnam, I lost my backpack with everything in it — including my trusty, dusty Canon 5D Mk II, and the only piece of glass that mattered. I started doing research on the current SLR market. Nothing out there seemed that impressive or able to meet the intensive demands of adventure photography — including the (at the time) recently-announced 5DS. That is, until I ran across the recently released 36 megapixel Nikon D810 ($3,000 Body Only.) It was time to give it a shot.

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Oct 092014
 

“When I first read the details about the new Nikon D810, I already knew we had a winner on our hands. Yes, incremental update cameras like this are usually not very well received, however, the Nikon D800 and D800E were already reigning champions in the DSLR world. Their claim to fame being their stunning image quality, and the fact that their sensors rank the highest on DXOMark’s overall sensor rating. (Even compared to some medium format digital cameras!)  Most notably, they hold a downright shocking lead over any other competitor (especially Canon) in the specific category of dynamic range.”

To view full article please click the link below:

slrlounge

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 d810Buy it Now
Sep 082014
 

 

“The term ‘game changer’ is tossed about in photographic circles like ‘love’ is among teens.. Most don’t really know how to identify either. When the D800 came around a few years back, the sheer enormity of the statistics involved made everyone stop and think, once again, that this could be it. It captured the hearts and adoration of the masses more than Nikon’s flagship, and there was much high-tone and fancy-chat about it biting at the leg of medium format. Well, it’s been a few years and the D800 has already got its third variant, and more so than ever it seems, this is the camera that would live up to the hype first placed on its forbearer’s shoulders. But how much better is it? Or is it better?”

To view full article please click the link below:

slrlounge

 

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Buy it now 

“The new 36-megapixel full-frame Nikon D810 benefits from not having an AA filter. Although that’s what everyone thought the D800E’s was supposed to be. In this head-to-head comparison review we put both cameras through their paces to find out whether the D810 is really worth the upgrade or would you be fine with a D800E?”

Jul 252014
 

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Nikon’s replacement for both the D800 and D800E, the D810, falls into that latter category: an incrementally improved DSLR that probably won’t receive too much flack for it.

Of course, by ‘incrementally improved,’ we don’t mean to say there aren’t features worth upgrading for, and D800 owners in particular will be tempted. Nikon is quick to point out that the D810 and its all-new 36.3-megapixel FX CMOS sensor without Optical Low Pass Filter (OLPF) offers the ‘best image quality in Nikon history.’

Beyond the new sensor and the COMPLETE lack of an OLPF (the D800E had one, but the anti-aliasing properties had been ‘canceled’), Nikon also packed the D4s’ powerful EXPEED 4 processor inside the updated camera, making sure that moire is suppressed as much as possible to make up for the missing filter, and pushing the hardware to greater heights.

ISO now runs from an impressively low 64 all the way up to 12,800 (expandable to 32-51,200) with the same noise reduction performance Nikon was boasting about for the D4s. The camera is also said to run 30% faster thanks to the new processor, while simultaneously saving battery.

To view full article please click the link below:

Petapixel

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Buy it now