Sep 172015
 

sony

Today Sony announced that they’ll be bringing High Dynamic Range support to “more” of their 4K Ultra HD television sets. Two models already have support for this feature, while three more are set to earn an update in the near future. This update brings Sony’s HDR to content that supports it – Amazon Video is one example. With this feature, users see a higher dynamic range of color, luminosity, brightness – for a more distinctive viewing experience. More detail, more color, more intensity.

In addition to the X930C and X940C models announced to be attaining HDR earlier this year, three more models will have the software necessary to execute HDR in the near future via a network update. The X850C, X900C, and X910C will have HDR abilities this Fall.

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slashgear

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Sep 082015
 

SonyVPL-VW520ESBlack

Aside, perhaps, from Panasonic ’s announcement that it’s going to launch its first OLED TV, the biggest news from the recent IFA show in Berlin was the unstoppable growth of high dynamic range (HDR) technology. Almost every AV brand had some HDR-related news to share – and in Sony ’s case this news included the launch of the world’s first HDR-capable 4K projector.

The projector in question is the VPL-VW520ES: Sony’s new mid-range 4K replacement for last year’s outstanding VW500ES. And now, having brought you news of its unveiling a few days ago, I can share my first impressions of how this exciting new home cinema machine actually performs.

The half hour or so I got to spend watching the VW520ES strut its HDR 4K stuff chiefly comprised a 4K but non-HDR scene from The Blacklist, plus the Times Square sequence of Amazing Spider-Man 2 shown first in HDR, then in standard dynamic range (SDR), and then in HDR again.

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forbes.com

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Aug 202015
 

neveroverexpose

MIT scientists have designed a new camera that will never overexpose a photograph, no matter what the lighting situation is. Called a “modulo camera,” it captures a high dynamic range photo with every exposure.

Instead of capturing multiple photos at different exposures, as with traditional HDR imaging, the camera only requires a single exposure.

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petapixel

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Jul 312015
 

Technicolor-970-80

High dynamic range (HDR) is the next big thing in both movies and TVs. We’ve seen 4K in the cinema and ultra HD arrive in our homes, with more and more content for both appearing. Now Technicolor is getting behind the tech, and is offering a way to both back-render standard range (SDR) content as well as stream full HDR video.

HDR is the visually rich step up from UHD fidelity which the move from 1080p to 4K simply hasn’t been.

Essentially, HDR is designed to give far more depth to an image, offering more range to colours and more detail to shadows. Imagine a ray of sunlight in a variety of orange and yellow hues rather than just straight white light.

It makes things pop.

I recently checked out Dolby Vision, that company’s proprietary HDR tech, at a screening of Pixar’s Inside Out and it was stunning. Having seen an SDR version of the movie now, and how flat the iridescent colours look by comparison, I’m sold.

Technicolor, though, is claiming its HDR tech is both open and able to be applied to SDR content for a high dynamic range upscale. It’s also planned to be one of the HDR options available to the upcoming Ultra HD Blu-ray specification.

That alone will massively boost the amount of HDR content available.

The upscaling gives content providers real-time access to the colour information in a video, allowing for direct control over both the highlights, lowlights and mid-tones. As well as being able to apply this to existing content there’s speculation that it could work for live events, such as sport, too.

Quite how the upscaling will compare with full HDR content, only time will tell.

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techradar

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Jul 202015
 

Dolby Cinema-970-80

We’ve just checked out Dolby’s newest high-tech cinema in Hilversum, Holland. It’s only the second in Europe and the first to launch with the brand new twin Christie laser projectors necessary for Dolby Vision.

And the most impressive thing about it all was an empty screen.

That might sound utterly dismissive, but it’s genuinely not. The Vision demo I was treated to was seriously one of the most impressive things I’ve seen on a technological level in a cinema. It’s all about those advanced Dolby Vision projectors rocking the latest laser tech mixing wider colour gamut and high dynamic range (HDR).

These new projectors can create contrast levels far in excess of the current generation of digital projectors.

Where even the most advanced projectors are hitting contrast ratios of around 8000:1, and most standard ones around 2000:1, the Dolby Vision beamers are batting above 1,000,000:1. Count those zeros…

And that means real, deep, inky blacks.

Dolby_inside-650-80

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techradar

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Jul 022015
 
Industrial Design by LUNAR.

Industrial Design by LUNAR.

Virtual reality startup Jaunt is getting ready to build its own cameraJaunt announced a new series of camera systems code-named Neo Tuesday that promises 360-degree high dynamic range video capture for cinematic virtual reality (VR) experiences.

Jaunt has been in the business of producing cinematic VR since 2013. But up until now, it has used custom rigs made from off-the-shelf cameras and 3-D printed components to capture VR video, which has had a number of downsides. For one, the cameras are not synchronized, making both recording and processing content cumbersome.

But Jaunt’s director of hardware engineering Koji Gardiner also said that most off-the-shelf cameras have inadequate image sensors for VR. A 360-degree camera captures the entire scene, making it close to impossible to hide a light kit from a viewer’s eye, which is why most VR is being shot with natural light. “Lighting is hard for VR,” Gardiner said. That’s why the Neo systems use a custom lens design and large image sensors to capture more light.

A number of companies have built their own camera rigs for VR, with some embracing very expensive, high-resolution cameras while others simply use GoPros or other action cams. There’s also intense debate about the number of cameras used in a VR rig. Google recently introduced its own camera rig called Jump that’s based on 16 GoPro cameras.

Read More:

variety.com

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Jun 222015
 

kingsman_the_secret_service_Still

Fox Home Entertainment is releasing its first titles in Ultra HD resolution with high dynamic range (HDR): Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Maze Runner, Life of Pi and Exodus: Gods and Kings.

Additional UHD with HDR titles are expected to follow in the coming weeks. The initiative is led by Fox Home Entertainment and the Fox Innovation Lab, which has been experimenting with UHD with HDR mastering.

As previously reported in The Hollywood Reporter, 20th Century Fox recently decided to make versions of all of its new and recent movies in UHD with HDR, the biggest commitment to date on the content side.

The new titles are part of a beta launch, through which consumers can purchase these movies on M-GO and download them to their Samsung Video Pack, for viewing on Samsung SUHDTVs, which support UHD and HDR. (Fox previously supplied clips from Pi and Exodus for Samsung demonstrations).

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thehollywoodreporter

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Jun 102015
 

tomorrowland-hdr

Want to see the Dolby Vision HDR format in action? You can check it out at the El Capitan Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, where Disney’s Tomorrowland—the first film graded for Dolby Vision—is enjoying a four-week run. AMC has the system installed in one auditorium each at the AMC North Point Mall 12 in Atlanta, the AMC BarryWoods 24 in Kansas City, and the AMC Deerbrook 24 in Houston. On May 29, those theaters replaced Tomorrowland with San Andreas, the first Dolby Vision title from Warner Bros. Pixar’s Inside Out, opening June 19, will be the next fix for HDR junkies who crave brighter whites and broader dynamic range

The key to efficiently encoding all of the brightness information in a HDR picture for Dolby Vision is something called the perceptual quantizer, or PQ for short. Dolby researched human visual perception of luminance changes, then developed a new quantization curve based on those findings. The goal was to specify brightness levels from 0 to 10,000 cd/m2 using 10-bit or 12-bit encoding. The resulting PQ curve, approved as SMPTE Standard 2084, replaces gamma for Dolby Vision image encoding. In post-production, this means the image must be graded twice—one time for the standard P3 color space that most cinema viewers will see, and then again in the PQ format that specifies characteristics of the HDR version. Read this 2014 SMPTE presentation by Dolby Labs researcher Scott Miller for the nitty-gritty.

Tomorrowland was graded on DaVinci Resolve at Company 3, where Stephen Nakamura said his goal in the 31.5 foot-lambert Dolby Vision pass was to make sure the picture took advantage of the expanded dynamic range while still retaining the feel of the standard 14 foot-lambert version. He elaborated on the grading process, and the thinking behind some of the creative decisions, in a statement released through Blackmagic.

tomorrowland-laser-pin

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studiodaily

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Jun 022015
 

WIE_McCreary_a_p

Producers Guild president Lori McCreary admitted that with an expanding number of formats — for instance with high dynamic range (HDR) and higher resolution gaining more attention — she’s concerned about what productions will look like when they are displayed in eight or 10 years.

Director of photography Oliver Bokelberg (Scandal) added that he worries even today, saying, “No theaters are the same. They are too dark or too bright.”

They and other speakers on a “Picture Clarity” panel (which I moderated), Saturday at the PGA Produced By conference, agreed that creative intent is an issue as technology continues to change. But they also reported that workflows are systematic and understood, and work is being done toward maintaining consistency.

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thehollywoodreporter

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May 212015
 

LG55EG960VFrontColour

In a dramatic about turn from previous announcements, LG has exclusively revealed to me today that it’s going to add high dynamic range video playback to its current range of OLED TVs.

According to a statement from LG’s Korean headquarters, the ability to handle HDR video with its higher contrast, more richly coloured images will be added to LG’s EG9600/EG960 OLED TVs via a network update. The statement also promises that the firmware update will include the ability to handle HDR both through LG Smart TV partner apps or video streams delivered via other devices through the TV’s IP interface.

LG wouldn’t be drawn on an exact date for when the firmware update might start rolling out to its EG9600/EG960V TVs, only stating that it will ship “once technical specifications for HDR are finalised”.

Prior to this new announcement, we’d been led to believe that we wouldn’t be able to get our hands on an HDR-capable OLED TV from LG until later in the year, following a potential unveiling at the IFA technology show at the end of August.

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forbes.com

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May 142015
 

dvds_1020.0

Don’t give up on physical media just yet. That’s the message from the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA), which this week announced that it’s completed work on the new Ultra HD Blu-ray format. The format offers support for 4K resolutions of up to 3840 x 2160 pixels and “significantly expands” the color range for movies and TV shows. It also allows for the delivery of high dynamic range (HDR) and high frame rate content (likely up to a maximum of 60fps). Licensing for the new format is scheduled to begin this summer, while consumers can expect backward-compatible Ultra HD Blu-ray players to hit the market towards the end of the year.

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theverge

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May 132015
 

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TV manufacturers have found that one of the most reliable ways to get consumers to buy a new TV is to push more pixels. The big jump was from Standard Definition (480 horizontal pixels using interlaced scanning) to High Definition (1080 horizontal pixels using progressive scanning). Today, we’re being pushed to buy “4K” TVs, but that definition switches the emphasis from horizontal pixels (there are 2160 of those) to the spec’s vertical pixels (3840) because it’s so much bigger than 1080.

Recently, however, an entirely new buzzword has entered the manufacturer’s vocabulary: High Dynamic Range (HDR). Suddenly the discussion isn’t just about more pixels, but better pixels. At its most basic, HDR delivers greater contrast between light and dark areas of a video image. How does that work and how important will it end being to your TV enjoyment? I shall endeavor to enlighten you.

How HDR works

If you’re familiar with High Dynamic Range at all, it’s likely via a setting on your smartphone or digital camera. As its name implies, the feature increases the dynamic range—the ratio of light to dark—in your photographs. It accomplishes this by photographing the subject three times at different exposures, doubling the light in each picture. The three images are then blended into one (in a program such as Photoshop, if the device doesn’t handle it internally) that retains the darkest and brightest parts from the first and third exposure, respectively. The result should be a brighter, more detailed picture that’s much closer to what your eye sees.

The idea behind HDR video is similar: It increases the range of brightness in an image to boost the contrast between the lightest lights and the darkest darks. If you’re having difficulty grasping how that translates into a more realistic image on your screen, think of the subtle tonal gradations a fine artist creates in a charcoal drawing to build the illusion of volume, mass, and texture, and you should begin to get the picture. But HDR doesn’t just improve grayscale; its greater luminance range opens up a video’s color palette as well. “Basically, it’s blacker blacks, whiter whites, and higher brightness and contrast levels for colors across the spectrum,” says Glenn Hower, a research analyst at Parks Associates.

The result is richer, more lifelike video images. Rather than washing out to white, as it would in conventional video, a ray of sunlight reflecting off a lake in HDR will gleam, and a bright cloud will appear soft and cottony. Basically any image your current TV would render shadowed, dull, muddy, or bleached out will look nuanced, vibrant, and strikingly realistic in HDR.

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techhive

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May 082015
 

panasonic_ag-dvx200

When it comes to image acquisition at resolutions of 4K and beyond, there’s some irony in the fact that many new 4K product introductions at NAB 2015 took place not at the high end of the market, but at the low end. Sub-$10,000 and even sub-$5,000 price points are the hot spots for new cameras that use 4K as a major selling point—even the flagship GoPro action cam shoots in 4K—and savvy shooters understand that resolution alone is by no means a reliable measure of overall picture quality.

But time marches on, and the 4K drumbeat is growing louder. The majority of people shooting with 4K cameras may still be delivering in HD, especially where broadcast television is concerned, but the amount of true 4K acquisition is certainly growing — streaming services including Amazon Prime and Netflix are insisting on true 4K deliverables even if cinema exhibitors are largely content screening 2K DCPs. Meanwhile, sports broadcasters are learning how to use systems like AJA‘s Corvid Ultra with TruZoom software to extract HD regions of interest from 4K camera feeds in real time. But the bottom line is that if you’re a vendor who wants to create buzz about your new camera, you’ll probably need to include 4K resolution among your marketing bullet points. And that means 2015 is the first year that will see a truly broad range of 4K shooting options become available, from premium cameras aimed at cinematic applications to inexpensive models designed for everyday use in less image-intensive projects.

As a case in point, take Panasonic. The company has come out swinging with the 4K VariCam 35, which is brand new on the market but seems to be well received. At its NAB booth, Panasonic showed a “Panavised” version of the camera configured to fit right in on a movie location or high-end TV production, and, using a darkly lit set, produced a compelling demonstration of the camera’s low-light capabilities at different ISO settings. When we asked about the VariCam HS, a super-slow-motion camera that was announced at the same time last year as the 35, but shoots only HD, not 4K, the Panasonic rep seemed surprised by the question.

– See more at: http://www.studiodaily.com/2015/05/4k-cameras-price/#sthash.sorr8zhR.dpuf

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May 072015
 

samsung-js95000-studio-1-970x0

 

If you’ve shopped TVs recently, you’ve no doubt been seduced by the term 4K UHD (Ultra High Definition). When UHD was first introduced a few years ago, it represented a jump in resolution – basically four times the resolution of 1080p HD. That seemed like a pretty big deal, but we now know that, in 2015, UHD is taking on an entirely new meaning. Going forward, the very best UHD TVs will not only offer higher resolution, but also offer more colors than ever before and something called High Dynamic Range, or HDR.

The idea behind HDR is that it can provide a higher level of contrast between light and dark images on the screen to create a much more realistic image. That may not sound like a lot on paper, but in reality, it’s a pretty significant move. In fact, many in the industry believe HDR represents a significantly bigger leap in picture quality than UHD’s higher resolution.

Imagine a TV picture that is more like what you see in real life. One with spectral highlights closer to what you see when the sun gleams off the surface of a lake, or when the stars and moon are especially bright in the sky. Imagine getting to see the exact same shade of green you see on Los Angeles’ highway signs on a TV for the very first time (did you know TVs haven’t been able to faithfully produce that color?) or a shade of red envisioned by a movie director that is so bright and exotic, you’re convinced you’ve never seen it before. HDR makes that possible.



Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/hdr-for-tvs-explained/#ixzz3ZQ9S8KvL 
Follow us: @digitaltrends on Twitter | digitaltrendsftw on Facebook

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Apr 242015
 

Sony presented some amazing new products at NAB 2015. Here Claus Pfizer speaks  to these new HDR developments.

Apr 242015
 

Looking to upgrade your 1080p TV to an Ultra High-Definition setup? Sony has opened pre-orders for some of the 4K UHD TV sets it showed off at CES.
Specifically, the X830C, X850C, X930C, and X940C come in sizes ranging from 43 to 75 inches, with prices starting at $1,300 all the way up to $8,000. Pre-orders are expected to ship in May.
The X830C series is the cheapest and smallest of the lot, measuring in at 43 inches or 49 inches, for $1,300 or $1,600, respectively. Then there’s the X850C, which is available in 55-inch, 65-inch, and 75-inch flavors for $2,199.99, $3,499.99, or $4,999.99.
For those who want the best of the best, Sony has the 65-inch X930C for $4,499.99 and the 75-inch X940C for a cool $7,999.99. Both of these models will be compatible with High Dynamic Range video, which can display a wider range of brightness levels for a more lifelike experience, via a network update this summer. Amazon and Netflix have both announced plans to embrace HDR video this year.
With HDR video, “customers can enjoy a peak brightness of LED as well as deeper blacks, providing them with a superior viewing experience compared to that of normal HDR video sources as well as any other video source,” Sony said.

Read more at:

pcmag.com

Apr 222015
 

acr91

Adobe made a big announcement for Lightroom CC/6 yesterday, but if you use Adobe Camera Raw for your RAW processing, don’t worry: Adobe didn’t forget about you. Adobe also quietly rolled out Adobe Camera Raw 9, an update that includes a few of the same big features that were introduced with great fanfare for Lightroom CC.

Like Lightroom CC, Adobe Camera Raw can now combine multiple RAW photos into a single RAW HDR photo or panorama. The tools are found as new options in the Filmstrip’s dropdown menu.

The big performance gains in Lightroom CC have also appeared in ACR. Camera Raw can now use your computer’s Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) as well, making your image editing much faster — especially as high resolution 4K and 5K screens start appearing on more and more desks.
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petapixel

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Apr 212015
 

We shall be watching for information as it becomes available throughout the day… Adobe released Lightroom 6 and Lightroom CC today at noon eastern time!

Technewstoday:

“The company has sold Lightroom as a standalone software or as a part of the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography subscription; the former will cost you $149 for the Lightroom 6 application, whereas, the latter’s subscription is at $9.99 per month. However, Adobe makes it clear that if you choose to opt for the standalone option, you might have to forsake the ability to sync photos to its mobile application suite such as Slate, Voice or Lightroom Mobile.

Along with face detection, Adobe Lightroom adds panorama and HDR, plus its software has been tweaked further to boost performances. The HDR features are quite common in applications, even Adobe’s basic options such as Photoshop Elements.

Other features include Radial filter and Graduated Filter Brushes, and desktop slideshow options with pan-and-zoom effect. Adobe not only updated the Windows and Mac app but also paid attention to push the update to its mobile applications on iOS and Android. The mobile apps brings better photo-grouping options and tools for cropping, and copy-pasting received adjustments as well.

Senior Product Manager for Adobe Photography Products, Sharad Mangalick, stated: “What we’re seeing is an opportunity for Adobe to step in and streamline the workflow and clean it up so that photographers, whether you’re pro or very casual, can have the best output with the highest quality and have it be really simple to use.”

Update:

The New Adobe Lightroom 6 is out now! It has just been officially announced at12.01 PM EST on 04/21/2015

http://adorama.evyy.net/c/62404/51926/1036?u=http://www.adorama.com/AB65237578.html
Adobe Lightroom 6 for Mac and Windows
$149.00

The new Lightroom 6 has face recognition, Panorama Merge (stitch together multiple images, including raw files to create unique panorama shots), faster performance for importing and perfecting your photos, Advanced Video Slideshows and more. For a comparison sheet with Lightroom 4 and 5 and detailed information on the new product, see files provided by Adobe here:https://www.dropbox.com/sh/vvje52kk41qvhro/AAAikW2izapl2pJ8id6Tht6La?dl=0

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Apr 172015
 

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Vizio announced earlier this week that it will be among the first TV manufacturers to ship sets that use the Dolby Vision high dynamic range imaging technology that Dolby Labs first showcased at CES—in 2014.

In fact, the TV manufacturer showed these same 4K displays way back then, captivating attendees and critics alike. The Vizio Reference Series—to be available in 65- and 120-inch screen sizes—pack Vizio’s own V6 hexa-core processor, dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and a built-in sound bar with two satellite speakers.

With Dolby Vision intended to be the biggest selling point for these new TVs, a brief description of the much-touted technology is in order. Despite consensus among various stakeholders that HDR is the next big step for TVs, the industry has yet to agree on a standard for HDR TVs and content. Dolby Vision is one of the technologies trying to fill that void.

You might want to put off that 4K TV purchase for a few more months.

According to Dolby, this is an “end-to-end” solution meant for everyone from content creators to over-the-top (OTT) providers to TV manufacturers. Dolby Vision combines a high dynamic range with an extended color gamut to deliver more vibrant and realistic images.

A TV’s dynamic range or contrast ratio, for those who don’t know, describes the contrast between its darkest blacks and brightest whites. The higher the dynamic range and the wider the color palette, the more realistic the image tends to look.

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techhive

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Apr 152015
 

 

 

While still leaving many questions unanswered, Technicolor is using this week’s National Association of Broadcasters Show to reveal more of its plans to support high dynamic range, a feature that expands the range between the whitest whites and blackest blacks that can be seen on a TV or movie screen.

Announced steps include HDR color grading services for movies, TV shows and commercials. Also, the company plans to license what it calls an Intelligent Tone Management plug-in, developed to help broadcasters to create HDR content in their own facilities.

Hollywood is interested in HDR, but a challenge to a rollout is that various, some proprietary, formats are appearing.

Technicolor said its color grading services would launch in Los Angeles in June, supporting the HDR guidelines set by the UHD Alliance, an industry coalition that includes most of the Hollywood studios. Those guidelines, however, have not yet been set; Technicolor is hopeful something might be in place in the foreseeable future.

The Intelligent Tone Management plug-in was created to analyze video in real time and provide colorists with more control of luminance in the shadows, mid-tones and highlights. The company plans to license the plug-in, which is being tested with a planned release in June.

At NAB, Autodesk is demoing the plug-in with the Autodesk Lustre color grading system and Blackmagic Design, with its DaVinci Resolve color grading software. FilmLight also is planning support for its Baselight grading system.

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hollywoodreporter

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