Lightroom Mobile Adds Powerful RAW HDR Capture Mode in Latest Update

 HDR Images, HDR Info  Comments Off on Lightroom Mobile Adds Powerful RAW HDR Capture Mode in Latest Update
Mar 142017
 

Adobe released a major update for Lightroom Mobile on both iOS and Android today. And in addition to a few simple features like “speed review” and a notification widget for iOS, and radial & linear selection tools for Android, Adobe dropped a bombshell: RAW HDR capture… on your smartphone.

Smartphone cameras are improving by leaps and bounds, but they still fall far short of bigger-sensor brethren, particularly where dynamic range is concerned. This update, claims Adobe, will change all that, allowing your measly smartphone to capture a wider range of tones than previously possible:

“The new HDR mode works by automatically scanning the scene to determine the correct exposure range and then capturing three DNG files which are then automatically aligned, merged, deghosted, and tonemapped in the app,” explains Adobe. “You get a 32­bit floating point DNG, with all of the benefits of both an HDR and a raw photo, which is processed by the same algorithms with the same quality as the HDR technology built into Adobe Camera Raw and Lightroom.”

The new RAW HDR mode in Lightroom Mobile should make a mockery of your phone’s built-in HDR capabilities, which can typically balance out only the harshest of tones by using two JPEGs. In comparison, Lightroom’s Mobile’s three RAW DNGs are orders of magnitude more useful.

To take advantage, you’ll have to have an iPhone 6s or newer, iPhone SE, or iPad Pro 9.7-inch on the iOS side, or a Samsung S7, S7 Edge, Google Pixel, or Pixel XL for Android. Additional Android devices are being developed for “as quickly as possible.”

Here are some sample photos, all of them captured using this new HDR mode:

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HDRtist NX 1.0 introduced for macOS – Next generation HDR software

 HDR Software  Comments Off on HDRtist NX 1.0 introduced for macOS – Next generation HDR software
Feb 162017
 

Hengchun, Taiwan – Ohanaware Co., Ltd. today is proud to announce the release and immediate availability of HDRtist NX 1.0, their latest High Dynamic Range Imaging software developed exclusively for OS X. HDRtist NX is the third installment in the HDRtist series of applications that Ohanaware started back in 2009. NX is the absolute latest and most advanced version to date, featuring brand new technology and functionality that Ohanaware have been refining in the last 7 years.

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Insta360 Pro VR Camera – 8K, Up to 100fps 4K, HDR and RAW by: Graham Sheldon

 Gear  Comments Off on Insta360 Pro VR Camera – 8K, Up to 100fps 4K, HDR and RAW by: Graham Sheldon
Jan 082017
 

This week at CES 2017, Chinese camera manufacturer Insta360 announced their Insta360 Pro VR camera with a truly impressive spec list: 8K maximum resolution, 100fps in 4K, HDR, RAW and a great price tag.  All the details including pricing and availability below: 

I have had the opportunity to try several different types of 360 video cameras from a number of manufacturers, and anything below 4K tends to look blurry in my opinion. Some may scoff at the push for higher and higher resolution camera tech in the 2D world, but for VR I believe it’s absolutely necessary.

The Insta360 Pro VR camera has a few major features that could all add up to some gorgeous-looking VR video experiences in the future. Its 6 independent HD lenses can capture 360-degree video in up to 8K resolution in both RAW and HDR. When in 4K mode, the camera can also record up to 100fps. Specs like these put the camera more in line with premium 360 cameras like the $45,000 Nokia OZO or the $15,000 Google Jump, versus the cheaper Samsung Gear 360 ($278.00).

With a price tag of $3,000, the Insta360 Pro could appeal to both professional and hobbyist shooters alike when it hits the market later in the year. There is no word yet regarding the potential overheating issues that other 360 cameras in this category have also suffered from.

The “3D Video” mode lets you shoot 3D 360-degree video up to 6K, or up to 4K with real time stitching (H.265 or H.264). You can also live stream 360-degree video over Ethernet, WiFi and 4G (this will destroy your data plan) to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

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2016 HDR Contest Winners

 HDR Images, HDR Info, HDR Panoramas, HDR Software, News  Comments Off on 2016 HDR Contest Winners
Nov 222016
 

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pinnacleimagingsystems

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OmniVision’s new image sensors will bring zHDR technology to smartphones

 Technique  Comments Off on OmniVision’s new image sensors will bring zHDR technology to smartphones
Nov 182016
 

Chinese image sensor manufacturer OmniVision Technologies has announced four new smartphone sensors capable of capturing more dynamic range and less noise than ever before.
The four sensors use OmniVision’s second-generation PureCel Plus and PureCel Plus-S pixel technologies to achieve the increase in performance.
To increase dynamic range, OmniVision has increased full-well capacity (FWC), meaning each pixel is capable of collecting more light before clipping of the highlights begins to occur. This improvement is said to increase dynamic range by 20 percent over the previous generation.

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digitaltrends

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Google adds High Dynamic Range (HDR) video support to YouTube

 Technique  Comments Off on Google adds High Dynamic Range (HDR) video support to YouTube
Nov 162016
 

For some millennials, YouTube stars are more important than popular pop musicians or famous Hollywood actors. Older folks may not understand this phenomenon, but it actually makes a lot of sense — YouTube is a platform where many young people spend their time.

Today, Google announces that it is making YouTube even better. The service can already stream video in 4K, and is available on countless devices, but now the videos are gaining High Dynamic Range (HDR) support too. This means the content will be presented with better contrast and more vibrant colors. Of course, the benefits will only be relaized with displays that support HDR.

“Starting today, you can watch YouTube videos in HDR on supported devices, such as HDR TVs with the new Chromecast Ultra, and soon on all 2016 Samsung SUHD and UHD TVs. If you’re using a device that doesn’t yet support HDR, don’t worry, videos will still play in standard dynamic range. As more HDR devices become available, YouTube will work with partners to enable streaming of the HDR version”, says Steven Robertson, Software Engineer, Google.

Robertson also shares, “any creator can upload HDR videos to YouTube. To make sure creators can tell awesome stories with even more color, we’ve been working with companies across the industry. We’ve worked with the DaVinci Resolve team to make uploading HDR just as simple as SDR videos to YouTube. We’ve also outfitted the YouTube Spaces in LA and NYC with all the gear needed to produce great HDR content”.

Google shares the above side-by-side images to show the potential benefits. As you can see, the HDR image on the right is more detailed and vibrant, while the simulated SDR image on the left looks washed-out.

Want to check out some HDR content now? Google shares the following YouTube playlist that contains videos that are already compatible.

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betanews

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HDR? This Canon White Paper Demystifies High Dynamic Range

 HDR Info, Technique  Comments Off on HDR? This Canon White Paper Demystifies High Dynamic Range
Nov 062016
 

High Dynamic Range. Heard of it? Canon recently released a white paper on HDR written by Canon Fellow Larry Thorpe, laying down the key concepts and preoccupations regarding this emerging technology.

HDR. You’ve probably seen it advertised all over the place: on the latest generation Atomos recorders, on silly smartphone apps that take the High Dynamic Range look way over to the extreme, on new televisions and monitors claiming to be HDR Ready… It seems like its something we should want… but what is it?

In his recent white paper about HDR, Senior Canon Fellow Larry Thorpe explains the trends in advancements in imaging technologies, and the main 5 parameters in which there has been particular preoccupation.

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cinema5D

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Aurora HDR 2017 for Mac

 HDR Software  Comments Off on Aurora HDR 2017 for Mac
Nov 062016
 

The world’s most advanced HDR photo editor for Mac gains powerful new features
and a new look which will amaze, inspire and help you to make incredible
HDR photos.

What’s new in Aurora HDR 2017

  • Quick overview

    Get a sneak peek at the key features and improvements with Joseph Linaschke – professional photo educator and the founder of PhotoApps Expert.

  • Speed Improvement

    The new Aurora HDR 2017 is at least 50% faster in comparison with the previous version. So you’ll create more fantastic HDR photos in a shorter period of time. Speed improvements cover all aspects of Aurora HDR 2017.

  • Polarize Tool

    Instantly and dramatically enhance the sky, make colors more vivid and flawlessly remove unnecessary glare in your photos. Want to give it a try? Move the slider on the right to witness amazing changes.

  • Batch Processing

    Save time and quickly make your photos great. Aurora HDR 2017 automatically groups your brackets, applies the effects / settings you choose and produces fantastic results. Just pick the photos and Aurora will do the rest.

  • HDR Noise Reduction

    The noise reduction in Aurora HDR 2017 has been dramatically improved. Our new smart technology will automatically remove low-light color noise while merging the brackets or creating HDR from a single shot.

  • Top and Bottom Adjustments

    Quickly make striking improvements to your image with this redesigned tool that gives you complete flexibility and control over exposure, contrast, vibrance and more.

  • Luminosity Masking

    Automatically make advanced selections within your HDR photo based on the Zone System. Simply click one or more zones and dramatically enhance the part of your image without brushes or complicated selections.

  • Radial Masking

    Highlight the sun, a face or anything else on your photo with this powerful tool. Easily reshape the mask and adjust density, feathering or other settings to achieve a stunning result.

  • Advanced Tone Mapping

    Many photographers want realistic, sharp and natural results from their HDR tool. New Aurora HDR 2017 was created with this in mind, delivering less noise, better details and stunningly results for any photo, especially when starting with a RAW file.

  • See all improved features

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How HDR works

 HDR Images, Technique  Comments Off on How HDR works
Sep 302016
 

High Dynamic Range TVs and devices are here, along with HDR TV shows and movies. You can buy a new 4K HDR TV for as little as $450 and stream HDR Netflix and Amazon, or add a $300 Xbox and spin HDR 4K Blu-ray discs. HDR games are coming soon, and even phones and PC screens are attaching those three buzzy letters.

But how do they work? Is HDR just another marketing gimmick to sell TVs and other gear, with no technology behind it? What does it claim to do, and why is that better?

Well folks, if those are your questions, you’ve come to the right place.

What’s HDR?

For the basics about what HDR is, check out What is HDR for TVs, and why should you care?. The short version is an HDR TV, when showing special HDR content, has a wider dynamic range (i.e. contrast ratio), along with more steps in brightness (for smother transitions and more detail in bright and shadowy areas). Also, usually, HDR is paired with Wide Color Gamut (WCG), which offers a greater range and depth of color.

Unlike 4K resolution, curved screens or 3D, HDR is a TV-related technology we’re actually excited about. In the best cases it actually improve the image beyond what you’re used to with non-HDR video (standard dynamic range, or SDR), including conventional high-def, Blu-ray or even 4K. How much of an improvement–if any–depends first and foremost on the capabilities of TV itself, but also on the content.

Of course you’ll need to be watching actual HDR content on a new HDR TV to see the benefits. Fake HDR “upconversion” is available on some products, but it’s not the same.

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cnet

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The Newsshooter guide to the what, why and how of HDR

 Cinematography, Gear, HDR Digital Cinema, HDR Images, Technique  Comments Off on The Newsshooter guide to the what, why and how of HDR
Mar 312016
 

With the announcement of the Shogun Flame and Ninja Flame today, I thought now was a good time to explain what HDR is and why Atomos have made a panel that can resolve the brightness detail and colour accuracy of 10-bit HDR images.

Atomos have definitely been looking ahead to the future when it comes to HDR. While HDR is still very much in its infancy, Atomos have looked to future proof (as much as you can) their Flame series of monitor/recorders. By adding HDR support now, Atomos are giving you a monitor that will still be relevant for many years to come.

So why do we need HDR and what is it? Grab a coffee because this isn’t something that can be explained in a few paragraphs.

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newsshooter.com

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Nov 132015
 

the_hollywood_sign_h_2015

With interest in adding high dynamic range (HDR) to feature and TV content running high, global standards body Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers opened its annual Technical Conference & Exhibition on Monday with the release of a 50-page HDR study group report that it hopes will help standards bodies and stakeholders to find some commonality and sidestep a potential format war.

High dynamic range is a term used to describe a wider range between the whitest whites and blackest blacks in an image, and is viewed by many in Hollywood’s technical community as a feature that will create a more noticeable different to consumers, compared with resolution (Ultra HD or 4K) or high frame rates.

But with numerous companies and organizations using the term HDR in different ways, there’s concern that this could confuse consumers and possibly even start a format war.

The SMPTE report includes definitions, guidelines and other information. Importantly, it raises “red flags” by identifying key areas that require consensus, including brightness levels, compression and distribution, said SMPTE standards director Howard Lukk.

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Sep 212015
 

ap745727084330_copy

High Dynamic Range (HDR) — an image attribute that offers a wider range between the blackest blacks and whitest whites in images — has been generating plenty of interest in cinema circles, as well as for remastering movies for home entertainment, but the potential to offer HDR in live broadcasting is considered by many to be a key missing link in the HDR dialog. At this year’s IBC,  focus was moving in that direction.

Delia Bushell, managing director at BT TV and BT Sports in the UK, spoke about BT Sports’ recently-launched Ultra HD 4K sports channel and said the company is looking to add HDR capabilities, possibly in two years. Sky Broadcasting in the UK is among additional broadcasters testing HDR.

“There’s still some technology questions open, but the big issue is the cost,” said Twentieth Century Fox CTO Hanno Basse, who chairs the UHD Alliance that’s working on quality standards for HDR home entertainment. “For a Hollywood studio, making HDR is fairly straightforward. On the [live] TV side, they don’t have that luxury, especially if it’s 4K. They’ll need new cameras, switchers … and that’s a much higher investment.”

On the technology side of the equation, during IBC several manufacturers showed demonstrations of how live HDR broadcasting might be handled. For instance Technicolor teamed with video processing company Elemental (which was recently acquired by Amazon Web Services in a deal reportedly valued at around $500 million) to host a live IBC demonstration of a broadcast delivery system of 4K with high dynamic range.

The demonstration includes a new server-based version of Technicolor’s Intelligent Tone Management software that scales standard dynamic range source material (in this case, 4K at 60 frames per second) for HDR use. The aim is to allow sports or live event productions to continue use current cameras and infrastructure at a venue, and also upscale the broadcast to include HDR. The Elemental Live video encoder was used for encoding and delivery in the demonstration.

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Sep 172015
 

sony

Today Sony announced that they’ll be bringing High Dynamic Range support to “more” of their 4K Ultra HD television sets. Two models already have support for this feature, while three more are set to earn an update in the near future. This update brings Sony’s HDR to content that supports it – Amazon Video is one example. With this feature, users see a higher dynamic range of color, luminosity, brightness – for a more distinctive viewing experience. More detail, more color, more intensity.

In addition to the X930C and X940C models announced to be attaining HDR earlier this year, three more models will have the software necessary to execute HDR in the near future via a network update. The X850C, X900C, and X910C will have HDR abilities this Fall.

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Sep 082015
 

SonyVPL-VW520ESBlack

Aside, perhaps, from Panasonic ’s announcement that it’s going to launch its first OLED TV, the biggest news from the recent IFA show in Berlin was the unstoppable growth of high dynamic range (HDR) technology. Almost every AV brand had some HDR-related news to share – and in Sony ’s case this news included the launch of the world’s first HDR-capable 4K projector.

The projector in question is the VPL-VW520ES: Sony’s new mid-range 4K replacement for last year’s outstanding VW500ES. And now, having brought you news of its unveiling a few days ago, I can share my first impressions of how this exciting new home cinema machine actually performs.

The half hour or so I got to spend watching the VW520ES strut its HDR 4K stuff chiefly comprised a 4K but non-HDR scene from The Blacklist, plus the Times Square sequence of Amazing Spider-Man 2 shown first in HDR, then in standard dynamic range (SDR), and then in HDR again.

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Aug 202015
 

neveroverexpose

MIT scientists have designed a new camera that will never overexpose a photograph, no matter what the lighting situation is. Called a “modulo camera,” it captures a high dynamic range photo with every exposure.

Instead of capturing multiple photos at different exposures, as with traditional HDR imaging, the camera only requires a single exposure.

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petapixel

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Jul 312015
 

Technicolor-970-80

High dynamic range (HDR) is the next big thing in both movies and TVs. We’ve seen 4K in the cinema and ultra HD arrive in our homes, with more and more content for both appearing. Now Technicolor is getting behind the tech, and is offering a way to both back-render standard range (SDR) content as well as stream full HDR video.

HDR is the visually rich step up from UHD fidelity which the move from 1080p to 4K simply hasn’t been.

Essentially, HDR is designed to give far more depth to an image, offering more range to colours and more detail to shadows. Imagine a ray of sunlight in a variety of orange and yellow hues rather than just straight white light.

It makes things pop.

I recently checked out Dolby Vision, that company’s proprietary HDR tech, at a screening of Pixar’s Inside Out and it was stunning. Having seen an SDR version of the movie now, and how flat the iridescent colours look by comparison, I’m sold.

Technicolor, though, is claiming its HDR tech is both open and able to be applied to SDR content for a high dynamic range upscale. It’s also planned to be one of the HDR options available to the upcoming Ultra HD Blu-ray specification.

That alone will massively boost the amount of HDR content available.

The upscaling gives content providers real-time access to the colour information in a video, allowing for direct control over both the highlights, lowlights and mid-tones. As well as being able to apply this to existing content there’s speculation that it could work for live events, such as sport, too.

Quite how the upscaling will compare with full HDR content, only time will tell.

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techradar

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Jul 202015
 

Dolby Cinema-970-80

We’ve just checked out Dolby’s newest high-tech cinema in Hilversum, Holland. It’s only the second in Europe and the first to launch with the brand new twin Christie laser projectors necessary for Dolby Vision.

And the most impressive thing about it all was an empty screen.

That might sound utterly dismissive, but it’s genuinely not. The Vision demo I was treated to was seriously one of the most impressive things I’ve seen on a technological level in a cinema. It’s all about those advanced Dolby Vision projectors rocking the latest laser tech mixing wider colour gamut and high dynamic range (HDR).

These new projectors can create contrast levels far in excess of the current generation of digital projectors.

Where even the most advanced projectors are hitting contrast ratios of around 8000:1, and most standard ones around 2000:1, the Dolby Vision beamers are batting above 1,000,000:1. Count those zeros…

And that means real, deep, inky blacks.

Dolby_inside-650-80

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Jul 022015
 
Industrial Design by LUNAR.

Industrial Design by LUNAR.

Virtual reality startup Jaunt is getting ready to build its own cameraJaunt announced a new series of camera systems code-named Neo Tuesday that promises 360-degree high dynamic range video capture for cinematic virtual reality (VR) experiences.

Jaunt has been in the business of producing cinematic VR since 2013. But up until now, it has used custom rigs made from off-the-shelf cameras and 3-D printed components to capture VR video, which has had a number of downsides. For one, the cameras are not synchronized, making both recording and processing content cumbersome.

But Jaunt’s director of hardware engineering Koji Gardiner also said that most off-the-shelf cameras have inadequate image sensors for VR. A 360-degree camera captures the entire scene, making it close to impossible to hide a light kit from a viewer’s eye, which is why most VR is being shot with natural light. “Lighting is hard for VR,” Gardiner said. That’s why the Neo systems use a custom lens design and large image sensors to capture more light.

A number of companies have built their own camera rigs for VR, with some embracing very expensive, high-resolution cameras while others simply use GoPros or other action cams. There’s also intense debate about the number of cameras used in a VR rig. Google recently introduced its own camera rig called Jump that’s based on 16 GoPro cameras.

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variety.com

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Jun 222015
 

kingsman_the_secret_service_Still

Fox Home Entertainment is releasing its first titles in Ultra HD resolution with high dynamic range (HDR): Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Maze Runner, Life of Pi and Exodus: Gods and Kings.

Additional UHD with HDR titles are expected to follow in the coming weeks. The initiative is led by Fox Home Entertainment and the Fox Innovation Lab, which has been experimenting with UHD with HDR mastering.

As previously reported in The Hollywood Reporter, 20th Century Fox recently decided to make versions of all of its new and recent movies in UHD with HDR, the biggest commitment to date on the content side.

The new titles are part of a beta launch, through which consumers can purchase these movies on M-GO and download them to their Samsung Video Pack, for viewing on Samsung SUHDTVs, which support UHD and HDR. (Fox previously supplied clips from Pi and Exodus for Samsung demonstrations).

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thehollywoodreporter

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Jun 102015
 

tomorrowland-hdr

Want to see the Dolby Vision HDR format in action? You can check it out at the El Capitan Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, where Disney’s Tomorrowland—the first film graded for Dolby Vision—is enjoying a four-week run. AMC has the system installed in one auditorium each at the AMC North Point Mall 12 in Atlanta, the AMC BarryWoods 24 in Kansas City, and the AMC Deerbrook 24 in Houston. On May 29, those theaters replaced Tomorrowland with San Andreas, the first Dolby Vision title from Warner Bros. Pixar’s Inside Out, opening June 19, will be the next fix for HDR junkies who crave brighter whites and broader dynamic range

The key to efficiently encoding all of the brightness information in a HDR picture for Dolby Vision is something called the perceptual quantizer, or PQ for short. Dolby researched human visual perception of luminance changes, then developed a new quantization curve based on those findings. The goal was to specify brightness levels from 0 to 10,000 cd/m2 using 10-bit or 12-bit encoding. The resulting PQ curve, approved as SMPTE Standard 2084, replaces gamma for Dolby Vision image encoding. In post-production, this means the image must be graded twice—one time for the standard P3 color space that most cinema viewers will see, and then again in the PQ format that specifies characteristics of the HDR version. Read this 2014 SMPTE presentation by Dolby Labs researcher Scott Miller for the nitty-gritty.

Tomorrowland was graded on DaVinci Resolve at Company 3, where Stephen Nakamura said his goal in the 31.5 foot-lambert Dolby Vision pass was to make sure the picture took advantage of the expanded dynamic range while still retaining the feel of the standard 14 foot-lambert version. He elaborated on the grading process, and the thinking behind some of the creative decisions, in a statement released through Blackmagic.

tomorrowland-laser-pin

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studiodaily

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