ALEXA vs Varicam LT vs GH4 vs A7s – with William Wages, ASC – ON THE GO – Episode 83

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on ALEXA vs Varicam LT vs GH4 vs A7s – with William Wages, ASC – ON THE GO – Episode 83
Feb 042018
 

n this episode of cinema5D ON THE GO, we wrap up our conversation with William Wages, ASC regarding using Lumix cameras on high-end productions.

 

Continuing our discussion about how William has changed to currently preferring the Varicam LT and Lumix environment, he tells us about the blind test he carried out to convince decision makers that the GH series of Panasonic cameras was indeed worthy.

But is there really a place for a Micro Four-Thirds sensor in the world of high-end filmmaking? As William says, the kind of situations that would require deploying a GH camera are exactly those where it would be challenging to set up a follow focus system. For this reason, the more restricted depth of field that the Micro Four-Thirds sensor size offers would in fact prove to be an advantage.

We also discuss Panasonic’s latest addition to its range of filmmaking cameras: the Panasonic EVA-1. While it could prove to be a solid B-Cam option to the Varicam line, for William Wages the small size of the Lumix line is still a major plus over this new model. (Please note that this episode was recorded before Panasonic released the final specs of the EVA-1).

Read More:

cinema5D

~

Canon May Add Fingerprint ID to Its Cameras and Lenses

 Gear  Comments Off on Canon May Add Fingerprint ID to Its Cameras and Lenses
Jan 302018
 

Fingerprint ID is used on many smartphones these days for security and identification, but would you like to see the same feature on your camera gear? Canon has apparently developed a fingerprint ID system that can identify the photographer using the camera or lens.

Canon Rumors reports that a new Canon patent published this month in the US (US20180012061 A1) describes an “electronic apparatus having finger authenticating function.”

The patent and illustrations describe and show a camera and lens that have a fingerprint ID reader built into them.

Read More:

petapixel

~

Canon Takes 1st Place in 2018 Japanese Camera Ranking

 Gear  Comments Off on Canon Takes 1st Place in 2018 Japanese Camera Ranking
Jan 232018
 

The annual Japan BCN rankings are in and Canon emerges as the winner of some major categories, including DSLRs. Canon also wins the 2nd place in the category “mirrorless” and thus points Sony to 3rd place.

What are the annual BCN rankings, you might ask. The winners of one of the many categories are being determined by multible factors, the Japanese company behind it, BCN  (Business Computer News), explains:

The “BCN AWARD” is an annual (January 1st – December 31st) sales comparison of BCN, which collects the current sales data of large electronics wholesalers nationwide, PC specialty stores and Internet shops. It is a system for rewarding a manufacturer’s cumulative numbers.

These awards can be seen as an indicator of the (Japanese) market situation regarding all kinds of electronic goods, including digital cameras and lenses which renders the outcome interesting for us.

Read More:

cinema5D

~

Panasonic GH5S Video Hands-On – Highlights of the New Camera

 Gear  Comments Off on Panasonic GH5S Video Hands-On – Highlights of the New Camera
Jan 142018
 

The wait is over. Panasonic just announced their new flagship video-orientated mirrorless photo camera, the GH5S. Watch our GH5S Video Hands-on above! (And the Mini Documentary I’ve shot with that new camera) Promising to perform (much) better than its predecessor in low-light, the new camera was also designed to compete with Sony’s a7S series. Is it up to the task? In our opinion: YES! 

Before we get started:
Stay tuned to our continuous coverage of the new Panasonic GH5S. A short review and original footage is coming up today too. Tomorrow, please look out for Nino’s lowlight test/review video and on top, our exclusive interview with Yamane-san – head of Panasonic imaging division – where we ask the questions that deserve answers. Only on cinema5D.com!  

Read More:

cinema5D

~

DJI Reveals New Handheld Stabilizers at CES 2018 – Osmo Mobile 2 and Ronin-S

 Gear  Comments Off on DJI Reveals New Handheld Stabilizers at CES 2018 – Osmo Mobile 2 and Ronin-S
Jan 072018
 

DJI is aiming straight at the mobile & DSLR/mirrorless market with two new single-handed stabilizers. Meet Osmo Mobile 2 and Ronin-S, both of which will be presented at CES 2018 in Las Vegas.

Osmo Mobile 2 – an improved handheld smartphone camera stabilizer

The Osmo Mobile 2 has a lightweight design, a built-in three-axis gimbal and supports pivoting between landscape and portrait orientation (by the two-way mobile clamp). DJI’s SmoothTrack technology detects how you are moving the camera and compensates, so it becomes a smoother, more “cinematic” shot. On top of that, user experience has been improved and all the controls where simplified, DJI claims it’s now more similar to operating “a professional camera”.

Read More:

cinema5D

~

Sony Announces New E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 APS-C Lens ahead of CES 2018

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on Sony Announces New E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 APS-C Lens ahead of CES 2018
Jan 072018
 

Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 for APS-C cameras has just been announced a few days ahead of CES in Las Vegas. It’s their 46th E-Mount lens. They also released a silver version of the a6300 camera.

The new Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS E-mount lens includes a functional wide to telephoto focal range of 18-135mm, as well as an aperture range of F3.5-5.6, making this lens versatile whether you are filming indoors or outdoors. The lens auto focus features a linear motor, for fast and quiet operation. This could make for impressive auto focus tracking performance for video, when paired with the Sony a6500 for example, which is already known for its great video auto focus.

The lens features Sony’s powerful OSS or ‘Optical SteadyShot’ image stabilization which will aid in achieving steady and crisp images while shooting hand held, or in lower light scenarios. For improved optical performance, the lens also includes two extra-low dispersion elements and one aspherical lens which will reduce chromatic aberration.

Weighing only 325g, the lens and camera combination is ideal for those that like a lightweight and compact setup, whether that is for traveling, street work, or on a hand held gimbal.

Read More:

cinema5D

~

KipperTie Revolva – RED Lens Mount With Built In ND Filter Wheel

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on KipperTie Revolva – RED Lens Mount With Built In ND Filter Wheel
Dec 102017
 

KipperTie has announced Revolva, a new mount for the DSMC2 RED cameras offering a PL or EF mount with built-in ND wheel. The wheel can be swapped out quickly to more ND or even a diffusion set.

Kippertie has been known for making filtration-related RED products for some time. The Revolva may just be their most significant yet.

With a name and colour wave akin to another favourite UK camera accessory company, the Revolva is suitably garish in appearance as with many RED-related products.

It’s a lens mount and ND wheel built in-one. Both PL and EF mounts will be available, electronically also for aperture changes and lens data (exactly the same as the RED EF mount).

Read More:

cinema5D

~

AXIOM Open-Source Cinema Camera Unveils New Design and Recording solutions

 Gear  Comments Off on AXIOM Open-Source Cinema Camera Unveils New Design and Recording solutions
Dec 102017
 

Apertus has unveiled new major updates regarding technological and design solutions for AXIOM, the world’s first open-hardware and open-software cinema camera. Read on to learn more about this fascinating camera. 

 

AXIOM

Backed by a team of experts from a large swathe of technological and artistic fields (developers, filmmakers, engineers and artists), the apertus° project is stepping forward to the next level of manufacturing and delivering of the AXIOM camera.

cinema5D has been following the progression of this ambitious project from its beginnings, and it is indeed fascinating to see this open-source camera taking shape. It’s actually finally starting to look like a cinema camera!

AXIOM camera main features:

– 4K resolution

– Super35 sensor

– Global shutter

– Up to 15 stops dynamic range

– Up to 300 fps

– 12 bit

– Target price well below $10,000

Read More:

cinema5D

~

Fstoppers Reviews the ZhongYi Mitakon Speedmaster 35mm f/0.95 for Fujifilm

 Gear  Comments Off on Fstoppers Reviews the ZhongYi Mitakon Speedmaster 35mm f/0.95 for Fujifilm
Dec 102017
 

Over the past few years, Zhongyi Optics have introduced several lenses in their Mitakon “Speedmaster” series of reasonably-priced, well-constructed, super-fast manual focus lenses. The 35mm f/0.95 Mark II lens falls straight into that category. We’ll be looking at the Fujifilm mount version, but this lens is also available for EOS-M and Sony E cameras. So, let’s get into it and look at sharpness, build quality, and, of course, bokeh.

I picked up this lens a little over a month ago and was initially a little disappointed with it. It didn’t seem to fit the Fujifilm system all that well and it certainly didn’t fit my style of shooting. That would all change over time as I got used to the way it was designed and learned to work with it for certain types of shooting. It’s certainly not an all-rounder, but it is a beautiful lens and one worth considering if you like to shoot wide open a lot.

Build Quality and Handling

The all-metal-and-glass construction of the ZY Mitakon 35mm f/0.95 makes for an “old-school” feeling lens. When I first picked it up, I found it reminiscent of the Nikkor 35mm f/1.4 I used to use on my old Nikon FM. The resistance in the focus ring and the weight were the first things that stood out to me.

At 460 grams and just 63x60mm in size, it is a stocky lens that feels very solid in the hand. It’s almost too heavy on the smaller Fujifilm bodies and I found that it felt best on the X-Pro2. On the X-T2, or especially with the smaller bodies, it tips the center of balance too far forward and I felt like I was constantly supporting the lens and not the body. Compared to Fujifilm’s 35mm offerings it is much larger and heavier and you will instantly notice the difference.

The aperture ring is positioned at the front of the lens and is declicked. Both of these things feel rather strange on a Fujifilm body at first and take some getting used to. The aperture ring is far too easy to knock in the position it is in. Perhaps a lock switch would help to stop it from rotating with everything it touches. I have found that keeping it at f/0.95 (and let’s face it, that’s why you buy the lens) is quite difficult in the field. I’m constantly having to check the ring before I raise the camera to my eye. This declicked design may be useful for video shooters, but to be honest, I’d prefer a clicked aperture for stills.

The front element of the lens also sits disconcertingly close to the end of the lens barrel and the package doesn’t come with a lens hood. This is disappointing in a $500-plus lens and I would hope that ZhongYi includes hoods with their future lenses. There are a few options out there from third-party manufacturers, so you can certainly get one to fit.

Read More:

fstoppers

~

Freefly Movi is a Cinematic Gimbal for Your Smartphone

 Gear  Comments Off on Freefly Movi is a Cinematic Gimbal for Your Smartphone
Dec 072017
 

 

Freefly creates professional drone and gimbal solutions for the cinema industry, and today it released a specialized gimbal for smartphones: the Freefly Movi.

“Movi’s incredible stabilization technology is the same found in our professional rigs,” says Freefly. “Freefly Gimbals are first-in-class stabilizers used in multimillion-dollar films.”

Read More:

petapixel

~

10 Handy Photoshop Shortcuts for Working with Layers

 Technique  Comments Off on 10 Handy Photoshop Shortcuts for Working with Layers
Dec 072017
 

Adobe just released this helpful 2-minute video that shares 10 handy shortcuts you can use in Photoshop when working with layers.

Here’s a quick rundown of the 10 shortcuts (watch the video above for visual demonstrations):

1. Add layer masks to hide all

To quickly add a layer mask to hide all of a layer, just hold down the Option key on Mac (or Alt on Windows) and click on the “Add Layer Mask” button in the Layers panel.

2. Delete layer masks

Instead of dragging a layer mask into the bin, you can just right click the layer mask itself and delete it from the tooltip menu that appears.

3. Add a layer mask based on selections

Creating a layer mask of a selection you have made is a useful thing to do for Photoshop users. Clicking the “Add Layer Mask” button will reveal your selection, but if you want to hide it then you just need to hold the Option key on Mac (or Alt for Windows) while clicking.

4. Invert a layer mask

If you want to invert your layer mask, just hold Command + I on Mac (or Control + I on Windows) to quickly move between the two.

Read More:

petapixel

~

The Sigma 85mm 1.4: One Year Later

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on The Sigma 85mm 1.4: One Year Later
Nov 282017
 

About this time last year, the Sigma 85mm 1.4 Art series lens was released and I went ahead and decided to pull the trigger and invest in the new glass. I had heard great things about other entries in the art lineup and understandably Sigma’s new 85mm focal length was getting a solid amount of hype. For the past year, I have been shooting exclusively with Sigma’s 85mm. It’s been the only lens in my camera bag and the only lens I’ve used for a straight year. What follows are my impressions after a solid year of use; what I like about the lens and what I don’t like.

Let’s start out with some of the things that I love about this lens. After a year of continuous use, I can say that there is no question that the Sigma 85mm 1.4 is a great piece of glass. I am first and foremost a portrait photographer so the focal length itself is a no-brainer for me. As a short/medium telephoto lens, the 85mm gives me a gorgeous level of background compression, beautiful bokeh, and I don’t need to be overly concerned with facial distortion if I come in for a closeup shot. It’s been said before and will be said again that the 85mm focal length is pretty much perfect for portraits.

As I currently live in Colorado and have generally have access to gorgeous sunsets for most of the year I have developed a love for shooting backlit images. If you’ve ever shot backlit before, you know that depending on the angle and position of the sunlight, as well as your own preferences regarding lens flare, some lenses can be finicky about nailing focus. This is understandable as you’re basically asking your camera to nail focus while either direct or angled light is coming right into the lens. I can say with confidence that the Sigma 85mm handles backlighting scenarios like a boss. This is one of the first things that I noticed about this lens; even in less than ideal backlit situations, the lens is wildly successful at getting great focus right where you want it.

Read More:

fstoppers

~

The Steadicam Volt Smartphone Stabilizer is Now Shipping

 Gear  Comments Off on The Steadicam Volt Smartphone Stabilizer is Now Shipping
Nov 282017
 

We first reported about this product back in January 2017 upon launch of the Kickstarter campaign. The Steadicam Volt was developed by the Tiffen company, a pioneer in the camera stabilizing business, with its line of Steadicam stabilisers now a staple of the industry.

Read More:

cinema5D

~

DxOMark’s Pentax 645Z Review is Out After 2 Year Delay, Scores 101

 Gear  Comments Off on DxOMark’s Pentax 645Z Review is Out After 2 Year Delay, Scores 101
Nov 202017
 

Last month, we reported that DxOMark had reviewed the Pentax 645Z back in 2015 and given it a highest-ever score of 101 before pausing its medium format camera reviews prior to publishing any. That Pentax 645Z review is finally out, and DxOMark still has glowing things to say about the camera.

DxOMark says the 51.4-megapixel camera has extremely good image quality scores, and the large pixels on the sensor gives the camera the best low-light ISO scores ever recorded up to this point among all cameras.

“It’s clear from our testing that the Pentax 645Z’s sensor is extremely capable, coming within a whisper of matching the performance of the Hasselblad X1D sensor (our highest-scoring sensor to date),” DxOMark says. “The 645Z’s high dynamic range and color sensitivity make it ideally suited for capturing the types of scenes that are traditionally favored by medium-format photographers — landscapes, weddings, portraits, and still lifes (commercial).”

The camera is interesting to compare against the Nikon D850, DxOMark says. The Pentax has a sensor that’s 1.7 times larger, but the D850 is about 3 years newer. The Nikon D850 actually stacks up well against the medium format camera thanks to Sony’s sensor manufacturing prowess.

Read More:

petapixel

~

FUJIFILM X-E3 Review – Sample Footage and First Impressions

 Gear  Comments Off on FUJIFILM X-E3 Review – Sample Footage and First Impressions
Nov 132017
 

The new FUJIFILM X-E3 is the latest edition to the ever growing family of FUJIFILM’s X-mount line. This APS-C sensor-sized, mirrorless stills camera, can shoot high quality 4k (UHD) video and, dare I say it, is the best they have produced so far! As a reviewer, I had the chance to work with the X-PRO2, X-T2, X-T20 and the GFX 50S. While all produce nice looking images, the new X-E3 sets itself apart from the crowd by offering greater ease of use (mostly due to the added focus lever and LCD touch screen), enhanced autofocus capabilities and very pleasing video quality. Read on for my FUJIFILM X-E3 review. 

FUJIFILM was kind enough to supply me with a production sample that I could use and explore for a few days; here are my findings from my FUJIFILM X-E3 review:

Ergonomics

The first thing I noticed when taking the camera out of the box was how light-weight it is, to the point of not being sure if FUJIFILM had decided to pull my leg and send me an empty camera shell! In a world where every gram counts, particularly in relation to international travel, this is a big advantage.

Read More:

cinema5D

~

Canon XF405 Review – Sample Footage and First Impressions

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on Canon XF405 Review – Sample Footage and First Impressions
Oct 262017
 

With the introduction of the new Canon XF405, XF400, LEGRIA/VIXIA GX10 – as well as the whole of Sony’s new line – one can assume that the fastest growing market for news and documentary shooting is coming in the form of 4K (UHD), handheld 1” sensor-size cameras. It is not that we haven’t had them before, but they certainly have been getting better and more feature-rich with time. When it comes to affordability… well, it totally depends on who you are talking to and the model you choose.

Canon XF405 camera

If you are an independent filmmaker looking for an all-round shooting device that can produce a bit of a cinematic look thanks to a slightly larger sensor than those traditionally found in these type of cameras, or if you’re a broadcaster looking to equip news crews with a versatile and affordable piece of equipment, then the Canon XF405/400/LEGRIA GX10 might be the right cameras for you. Sound tempting? Then read on for my full Canon XF405 review.

Before continuing, it is important for me to make it clear that the image coming out of the camera I tested may be slightly different than that of the final product.

Read More:

cinema5D

~

Sony a7R III Announced Along Sony 24-105mm f4 and 400m f2.8

 Gear  Comments Off on Sony a7R III Announced Along Sony 24-105mm f4 and 400m f2.8
Oct 262017
 

Today is a Sony announcement day that sees the unveiling of the Sony a7R III and 24-105mm f4 zoom, and the announcement of an upcoming 400m f2.8 G Master lens.

Sony a7R III

The wait is over: Sony has finally unveiled the first in the new generation of the A7 series. As always, the Sony a7R III comes at the vanguard of the new announcements – ahead of the A7 and S models – and this time brings a host of improvements to existing features and a few new surprises.

As expected, the new Sony a7R III brings a high pixel-count sensor, with its 42.4MP of resolution once again making this the model aimed primarily at professional stills photographers. The camera’s back-illuminated Exmor R and BIONZ X processor make this model capable of capturing 10 still frames per second, for a buffer of 76 continuous compressed RAW or JPEG images. ISO is available from 100-32000, and Sony claims that noise has been reduced by up to a full stop.

All of this with the advanced autofocus capabilities we have come to expect from this line’s R model, thanks to its 399 phase-detection AF points across 68% of the image, in addition to 425 contrast-detection points. Sony also claims that the camera’s Eye AF performance has been improved when the subject is moving, backlit or looking down.

What about video?

Just like with the II, the new Sony a7R III is capable of recording internal 4K in both full-frame and Super 35mm modes. As you may remember from some of our camera tests of the previous generation, the A7R II offered a better 4K image in crop mode, so it remains to be seen whether this will still be the case with the a7R III (take a look at some comparisons here, and our review here). It’s worth mentioning that the camera also supports proxy recording for easier editing of high-resolution videos, particularly useful when dealing with the relatively processor-intensive XAVC codec. Additionally, one of the biggest improvements to the video capabilities of the camera is the ability to achieve an increased resolution of 5K in Super 35mm mode thanks to an oversampling of a 15MP section of the sensor.

Read More:

cinema5D

Pre-Order:

Sony a7R III Mirrorless Digital Camera Body

Sony FE 24-105mm f/4 G OSS E-Mount NEX Camera Lens

DJI AeroScope is Designed to Track Down Your Drone While Airborne

 Gear  Comments Off on DJI AeroScope is Designed to Track Down Your Drone While Airborne
Oct 262017
 

DJI has unveiled a new tool designed to increase safety and security in a world of crowded air space. AeroScope can identify and track any DJI drone by using the existing link between the drone itself and the controller on the ground. A bold move, you might think. Certainly, but also a necessary one!

Security is always an issue, and it’s always about keeping a balance. Surveillance, incapacitation and big brother authorities on the one hand, privacy and freedom on the other.

Photograph credit: Bertrand Bouchez | unsplash.com

We need regulation for the increasing air traffic caused by affordable drones, sure. But we also need to avoid a surveillance state in order to enforce these regulations. In comes DJI AeroScope, a tool which tries to satisfy both sides.

DJI AeroScope

This upcoming technology won’t be available for everybody. It’s designed to be used by authorized parties like police or aviation authorities only. AeroScope has been installed at two international airports since April, and DJI is continuing to test the system in other environments.

Basically AeroScope is a receiver that can detect any drones within its range once that drone is powered on. Before it’s even airborne, AeroScope can already know its location and its unique registration number, which relates it directly to its registered owner.

Read More:

cinema5D

~

Review: The Nikon D850’s Negative Digitizer Isn’t Ready for Prime Time

 Gear  Comments Off on Review: The Nikon D850’s Negative Digitizer Isn’t Ready for Prime Time
Oct 242017
 

 

A couple weeks ago, I got a chance to run the Nikon D850 through its paces as a scanner. The “Negative Digitizer” feature, which can automatically flip negatives to positive got a lot of buzz as the camera was being released, and I was eager to try it out.

I’ve been using digital cameras to scan my negatives since I was first able to put my hands on one. When done properly, it’s possible to digitize very large collections quickly and efficiently.

Read More:

petapixel

~

How to Use the Foreground to Create Depth in Landscape Photos

 Technique  Comments Off on How to Use the Foreground to Create Depth in Landscape Photos
Oct 242017
 

Sometimes a beautiful landscape scene doesn’t look as good on camera as it did to your eye, but that’s because translating a 3-dimensional scene into a 2-dimensional space is challenging. Using strong foreground elements in your composition is one way to create depth and counter this problem, as shown in this 8-minute tutorial from Nature TTL.

There are a huge number of different rules and compositional guides you can adhere to, but one lesser-known rule is the “Rule of Odds.”

This suggests using an odd number of objects in your foreground, as the eye tends to find itself being drawn to the middle one. This means that you can use objects as stepping stones, drawing the eye into the image.

Read More:

petapixel

~