Adobe Premiere Pro’s Editing Tools Explained by; Jason Boone

 Technique  Comments Off on Adobe Premiere Pro’s Editing Tools Explained by; Jason Boone
Jun 152017
 

It took me several years of editing video before I became comfortable venturing out to use some of Premiere Pro’s editing tools. The problem is that you can accomplish almost everything you need with the Selection tool, and some editors are comfortable doing just that. You can perform simple trims, move clips around, and add transitions all using just the Selection tool. To be honest, you never really need to use any of the tools provided in Premiere Pro. However, by exploring tools such as Ripple Edit, Rolling Edit, Track Selection, Rate Stretch, Slip, and Slide, I’ve ended up saving myself countless hours in the edit suite.Take the Ripple Edit tool as an example. The Ripple Edit tool allows you to trim or expand a clip while simultaneously shifting (rippling) all of your assets further on down the timeline. This happens all in one movement. Performing the same action with the Selection tool could easily take 3 movements, and sometimes, even more, depending on the complexity of your project. If you use the Ripple Edit tool enough, it begins to save you quite a bit of time.

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Five Ways to Edit Video More Quickly in Adobe Premiere by; Alex Cooke

 Technique  Comments Off on Five Ways to Edit Video More Quickly in Adobe Premiere by; Alex Cooke
Mar 142017
 

Some view editing as the place where the magic happens, while others see it as a necessary evil before they can get back out to shoot some more. Either way, we’d all love to be more efficient at it. These five tips will help you speed up your workflow in Adobe Premiere.

I use workspaces constantly in Digital Performer, and they’ve dramatically increased my efficiency and allowed me to intuitively design my window sets for the task at hand. Along with workspaces come four other tips in this great video, including adjustment layers to apply effects and corrections to multiple clips simultaneously, using presets to save single or multiple effects, color-toning, etc. for easy access down the road, using nested sequences to ensure you can easily move around blocks of clips without disturbing their relative ordering, and of course, shortcuts to keep you out of menus.

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