Samsung Unveils High Dynamic Range 4K LED Cinema Display by; Fabian Chaundy

 HDR TV  Comments Off on Samsung Unveils High Dynamic Range 4K LED Cinema Display by; Fabian Chaundy
Apr 152017
 

The new 34-foot HDR LED cinema display from Samsung aims to offer impressive performance for a new age of the cinema viewing experience.

Samsung’s latest unveiling in cinema technology has clearly been designed for the new age of viewing experience. The 34-foot LED screen design follows the latest trend of High Dynamic Range, a hot topic that many manufacturers have been chasing after in recent times (check out THIS article for a recent example). Its 146fL (foot-Lamberts) make it over 10 times brighter than regular movie projectors, while offering “ultra-contrast and low tone grayscale settings” for contrast ratio of almost infinity:1.

Of course, it also features Cinema 4K resolution of 4,096 x 2,160, one of the features which make it DCI-compliant.

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HDR Photography vs. HDR TV Explained

 HDR Info, HDR Software, HDR TV  Comments Off on HDR Photography vs. HDR TV Explained
Apr 132017
 

You’re going to hear a lot about High Dynamic Range, or HDR in the next few years. HDR imaging is already leaving a mark on the photography industry. Now, HDR displays are making a splash too, although it will be some time before they become commonplace.

As a photographer, you might be tempted to purchase an HDR TV or and HDR screen. At least for now, that isn’t necessary or practical.

 

HDR TV vs. NON-HDR TV. Is there a difference?

HDR display and HDR capture, which we’ll discuss, aren’t the same things, although they have a similar goal. Each process makes a digital copy, whether it be a video or photograph, look more like the real thing.

With HDR for monitors or TVs, this display process refers to the device’s ability to recognize specialized content that standard devices cannot. Here, the goal is to make bright images even more so, while keeping the darker parts dark. This difference between light and dark, known as the contrast ratio, is greater on HDR-capable devices than on standard ones.

As CNET notes,

“In its simplest state, it means a brighter TV, but only in the areas on the screen that need it. The result is an image that really pops and looks more like what you’d see in the real world.”

Not surprisingly, the first HDR monitors are very expensive. One from Dell, for example, is expected to launch for $4,999, while the studio-grade Sony BVM X300 costs $18,000.

 

What are the alternatives to expensive HDR TVs?

Rather than paying for an HDR display, purchase an entirely new Apple Mac instead.

Apple currently offers a 21.5-inch iMac with a Retina 4K display and the 27-inch iMac with a Retina 5K display. It also offers a 12-inch MacBook, 13-inch MacBook Pro, and 15-inch MacBook Pro — all with Retina displays too. Each of these devices are ideal for professional and novice photographers alike.

The 21.5-inch iMac with a Retina 4K display features 4,096 x 2,304 resolution and 9.4 million pixels, which is 4.5 times more than the standard 21.5-inch iMac display. The 27-inch iMac features 14.7 million pixels, seven times more pixels than an HD display. Both iMacs are supported by a wider P3-based color gamut, which provides 25 percent larger color space than previous models.

How can I capture HDR with my camera?

By contrast to HDR display, HDR for cameras is a capture process where a display shows a wider and richer range of colors, crisper whites, and much deeper blacks.

Many of today’s most popular smartphones have HDR capabilities, including current generation iPhones, Samsung, and Sony devices. High-end cameras also utilize HDR.

 

From a technical standpoint, smartphones and cameras handle HDR imaging differently. Regardless, each has a similar goal: providing a greater contrast between light and dark images, by combining several photos taken during a single burst.

You capture each of these pictures at a different exposure called “stops” or “brackets,” during the HDR process. The first stop offers an extremely dark image, while the last one is extremely bright. When merged into a single image, the final photograph includes a greater exposure range.

Taking  HDR shots isn’t easy, and in some situations, not recommended. HDR mode requires a steady hand because it doesn’t capture action well. When movement is involved, alignment can be off, and double exposures can occur. Because of this, you should use a tripod.

HDR mode works best for high-contrast scenes such as landscapes or in scenes with backlighting. HDR is also nice when capturing objects in direct sunlight.

 

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Nov 132015
 

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With interest in adding high dynamic range (HDR) to feature and TV content running high, global standards body Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers opened its annual Technical Conference & Exhibition on Monday with the release of a 50-page HDR study group report that it hopes will help standards bodies and stakeholders to find some commonality and sidestep a potential format war.

High dynamic range is a term used to describe a wider range between the whitest whites and blackest blacks in an image, and is viewed by many in Hollywood’s technical community as a feature that will create a more noticeable different to consumers, compared with resolution (Ultra HD or 4K) or high frame rates.

But with numerous companies and organizations using the term HDR in different ways, there’s concern that this could confuse consumers and possibly even start a format war.

The SMPTE report includes definitions, guidelines and other information. Importantly, it raises “red flags” by identifying key areas that require consensus, including brightness levels, compression and distribution, said SMPTE standards director Howard Lukk.

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hollywoodreporter

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Oct 232015
 

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The market for high dynamic range (HDR) TV sets are forecast to become an everyday form factor in the television industry by 2019 when shipments rise to 32.6 million, according to a new report from IHS.

HDR TVs offer enhanced brightness for a broader palette of light outputs and sparking highlights. Currently, HDR TVs are a niche market because of the high price and lack of content for the high resolution displays with only 2.9 million units forecast to be sold in 2016. However, in the next three years, HDR TVs will rise by more than 11-fold, IHS says.

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Sep 252015
 

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Red Digital Cinema recently dropped an unexpected bombshell that radiated waves of excited expectation among filmmakers everywhere. This bombshell has a name. The Red Raven, a new $6K RED camera.

Word of RED Raven spread fast, attached to the simple hashtag #4K4ALL. Yes, the original disruptor, innovator and “freedom fighter” leading the independent film world into its biggest technological and creative revolution is at it again.

Details have remained vague and a full announcement has been promised for Friday 25th September but just today a few new details emerged.

4K4ALL carries with it very high expectations in terms of an affordable price point for RED’s latest new camera, and today we have a much better idea of where the RED Raven will be positioned.

Here’s what we know from Jarred Land himself:

“The Raven doesn’t replace Scarlet, It’s a new category in our line up. Raven is a younger, hungrier, more “spirited” member of the RED family with a bit of a chip on his shoulder ready to take on the entire sub-$10k market with images that you will be incredibly proud of.”

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Sep 212015
 

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High Dynamic Range (HDR) — an image attribute that offers a wider range between the blackest blacks and whitest whites in images — has been generating plenty of interest in cinema circles, as well as for remastering movies for home entertainment, but the potential to offer HDR in live broadcasting is considered by many to be a key missing link in the HDR dialog. At this year’s IBC,  focus was moving in that direction.

Delia Bushell, managing director at BT TV and BT Sports in the UK, spoke about BT Sports’ recently-launched Ultra HD 4K sports channel and said the company is looking to add HDR capabilities, possibly in two years. Sky Broadcasting in the UK is among additional broadcasters testing HDR.

“There’s still some technology questions open, but the big issue is the cost,” said Twentieth Century Fox CTO Hanno Basse, who chairs the UHD Alliance that’s working on quality standards for HDR home entertainment. “For a Hollywood studio, making HDR is fairly straightforward. On the [live] TV side, they don’t have that luxury, especially if it’s 4K. They’ll need new cameras, switchers … and that’s a much higher investment.”

On the technology side of the equation, during IBC several manufacturers showed demonstrations of how live HDR broadcasting might be handled. For instance Technicolor teamed with video processing company Elemental (which was recently acquired by Amazon Web Services in a deal reportedly valued at around $500 million) to host a live IBC demonstration of a broadcast delivery system of 4K with high dynamic range.

The demonstration includes a new server-based version of Technicolor’s Intelligent Tone Management software that scales standard dynamic range source material (in this case, 4K at 60 frames per second) for HDR use. The aim is to allow sports or live event productions to continue use current cameras and infrastructure at a venue, and also upscale the broadcast to include HDR. The Elemental Live video encoder was used for encoding and delivery in the demonstration.

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hollywoodreporter

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Sep 172015
 

sony

Today Sony announced that they’ll be bringing High Dynamic Range support to “more” of their 4K Ultra HD television sets. Two models already have support for this feature, while three more are set to earn an update in the near future. This update brings Sony’s HDR to content that supports it – Amazon Video is one example. With this feature, users see a higher dynamic range of color, luminosity, brightness – for a more distinctive viewing experience. More detail, more color, more intensity.

In addition to the X930C and X940C models announced to be attaining HDR earlier this year, three more models will have the software necessary to execute HDR in the near future via a network update. The X850C, X900C, and X910C will have HDR abilities this Fall.

Read More:

slashgear

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Sep 082015
 

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Aside, perhaps, from Panasonic ’s announcement that it’s going to launch its first OLED TV, the biggest news from the recent IFA show in Berlin was the unstoppable growth of high dynamic range (HDR) technology. Almost every AV brand had some HDR-related news to share – and in Sony ’s case this news included the launch of the world’s first HDR-capable 4K projector.

The projector in question is the VPL-VW520ES: Sony’s new mid-range 4K replacement for last year’s outstanding VW500ES. And now, having brought you news of its unveiling a few days ago, I can share my first impressions of how this exciting new home cinema machine actually performs.

The half hour or so I got to spend watching the VW520ES strut its HDR 4K stuff chiefly comprised a 4K but non-HDR scene from The Blacklist, plus the Times Square sequence of Amazing Spider-Man 2 shown first in HDR, then in standard dynamic range (SDR), and then in HDR again.

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forbes.com

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Aug 182015
 

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If Samsung is to be believed, the 65-inch UE65JS9500 represents a whole new category of TV technology; it’s not just a UHD TV, it’s an ‘SUHD’ TV.

While a few retailers seem to have bought into this suggestion, though, the truth is that it’s not really a completely new sort of LCD TV. It is, though, uniquely cutting edge in a number of areas.

These start with its design.

For as well as being boldly curved, the screen is suspended in a beautifully metallic, ultra-thin frame that further stands out from the crowd by being heavily chamfered. The whole thing is beautifully built too, and even the external connections box that comes with the TV benefits from a brushed aluminium finish.

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t3.com

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Jul 252015
 

As data, images and particularly video keep increasing the data load they consume, the difficulty in transporting them only grows, and this is where HDMI 2.0 and HDMI 2.0a come into the picture. In particular, they’re part of the future of 4K video content.

The video production industry, consumers with their TVs and PC monitors, gamers with their 4K-capable games and almost everyone in between keep piling on the demand for more pixels, more frames per second, more dynamic range, more colors and more whatever will make digital video look so much cooler. Meanwhile all this extra data has to get transported somehow and not just from A to B but from A to B at the speeds and smoothness we’ve all become accustomed to.

This is where HDMI 2.0 and its cousin 2.0a come into the picture. As our daily content loads become ever more difficult to squeeze through the same piping we’ve been using for some years smoothly, the two new versions of the ubiquitous HDMI have become vitally necessary.

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4K.com

What is HDMI 2.0a?

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Jul 232015
 

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Samsung has added a new model to its 2015 4K TV lineup, the bulk of which it began shipping in April. Based on the same Tizen smart-TV platform that powers the rest of the range, the new SUHD JS7000 is among the South Korean company’s more affordable ultra-HD offerings. The television is available in 50-, 55- and 60-inch variants, priced respectively at $1,300, $1,600, and $2,100.

The JS7000 is a quantum-dot set with full-array local dimming. In other words, they provide an incredibly wide color palette with very deep blacks to produce vibrant images. The company says it’s even good enough to handle HDR (high dynamic range) content, which is seen as the next big step after 4K and the key to delivering a more life-like TV experience. One image-enhancement feature that you are likely to find very useful—at least for now—is the TV’s ability to upscale lower-resolution images to its native 3840×2160 resolution.

This being a smart TV, you can use it to browse the Internet, run apps, and play games. It also boasts a host of other interactive features, including smartphone display mirroring and the ability to stream content to and from mobile devices. On the hardware side, the JS7000 packs a quad-core processor, four HDMI ports, three USB 2.0 ports, built-in 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and ethernet. There’s also an optional camera accessory for those interested in being able to control their TV through hand gestures.

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techhive

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Jun 172015
 

 

It was just 2013 when the marketing drums started beating for 4k and the response from that journalistic segment – seemingly paid to throw cold water on new technologies – was that 4k TV was unnecessary. The human eye can’t see 4k. Living rooms can’t be built big enough. And, the usual opening salvo: there’s no content.
The fracas over 4k has passed with hardly a scuffle. The people who have complained that 4k TVs are a long way away have shut up – much faster than usual because 4k TVs are being bought much faster than expected. Prices for 4k started their inevitable slide toward the end of 2014, and consumers predictably started buying. Worldwide sales for 4k TVs jumped 500 percent compared to last year, and the content has started to flow, or rather, stream.
The providers of OTT (over-the-top, as in over-the-Internet) content, such as Netflix, Amazon, and UltraFlix, are providing 4k content, and they promise to match the pace of innovation in ways their counterparts in cable and satellite can only dream about matching. However, DirecTV is also going to offer 4k service soon.
The upward trend for 4k TVs will continue of course, but, ironically, 4k really isn’t the point. The content creators and providers – the directors, cinematographers, and broadcasters – are much more excited about the potential of high dynamic range (HDR), and immersive audio, high frame rates, and whatever else they think up that 4k TVs could deliver. The inescapable message at NAB 2015 is that HDR is going to bring a real change in home TV viewing.
Cameras have been adding resolution, and along the way, have become capable of very wide ranges of light capture, which, if you’ll excuse a breathless aside – Isn’t it the most wonderful thing the way digital cameras have become so incredibly capable and relatively inexpensive? These cameras are enabling a shift in favor of independent filmmakers and cinematographers who can create professional content with their own equipment.
Last year, AJA introduced its own camera. A year or so before that, Blackmagic introduced theirs. The cameras have been slow to ship, and both companies admit that making cameras is a lot harder than they had thought, but the goal is end-to-end control over the pipeline: in this case, the entire acquisition to computer workflow. In fact, Blackmagic, Red, and Sony have also added software editing, color grading, audio, and more.
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cgw.com

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Jun 102015
 

tomorrowland-hdr

Want to see the Dolby Vision HDR format in action? You can check it out at the El Capitan Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, where Disney’s Tomorrowland—the first film graded for Dolby Vision—is enjoying a four-week run. AMC has the system installed in one auditorium each at the AMC North Point Mall 12 in Atlanta, the AMC BarryWoods 24 in Kansas City, and the AMC Deerbrook 24 in Houston. On May 29, those theaters replaced Tomorrowland with San Andreas, the first Dolby Vision title from Warner Bros. Pixar’s Inside Out, opening June 19, will be the next fix for HDR junkies who crave brighter whites and broader dynamic range

The key to efficiently encoding all of the brightness information in a HDR picture for Dolby Vision is something called the perceptual quantizer, or PQ for short. Dolby researched human visual perception of luminance changes, then developed a new quantization curve based on those findings. The goal was to specify brightness levels from 0 to 10,000 cd/m2 using 10-bit or 12-bit encoding. The resulting PQ curve, approved as SMPTE Standard 2084, replaces gamma for Dolby Vision image encoding. In post-production, this means the image must be graded twice—one time for the standard P3 color space that most cinema viewers will see, and then again in the PQ format that specifies characteristics of the HDR version. Read this 2014 SMPTE presentation by Dolby Labs researcher Scott Miller for the nitty-gritty.

Tomorrowland was graded on DaVinci Resolve at Company 3, where Stephen Nakamura said his goal in the 31.5 foot-lambert Dolby Vision pass was to make sure the picture took advantage of the expanded dynamic range while still retaining the feel of the standard 14 foot-lambert version. He elaborated on the grading process, and the thinking behind some of the creative decisions, in a statement released through Blackmagic.

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May 132015
 

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TV manufacturers have found that one of the most reliable ways to get consumers to buy a new TV is to push more pixels. The big jump was from Standard Definition (480 horizontal pixels using interlaced scanning) to High Definition (1080 horizontal pixels using progressive scanning). Today, we’re being pushed to buy “4K” TVs, but that definition switches the emphasis from horizontal pixels (there are 2160 of those) to the spec’s vertical pixels (3840) because it’s so much bigger than 1080.

Recently, however, an entirely new buzzword has entered the manufacturer’s vocabulary: High Dynamic Range (HDR). Suddenly the discussion isn’t just about more pixels, but better pixels. At its most basic, HDR delivers greater contrast between light and dark areas of a video image. How does that work and how important will it end being to your TV enjoyment? I shall endeavor to enlighten you.

How HDR works

If you’re familiar with High Dynamic Range at all, it’s likely via a setting on your smartphone or digital camera. As its name implies, the feature increases the dynamic range—the ratio of light to dark—in your photographs. It accomplishes this by photographing the subject three times at different exposures, doubling the light in each picture. The three images are then blended into one (in a program such as Photoshop, if the device doesn’t handle it internally) that retains the darkest and brightest parts from the first and third exposure, respectively. The result should be a brighter, more detailed picture that’s much closer to what your eye sees.

The idea behind HDR video is similar: It increases the range of brightness in an image to boost the contrast between the lightest lights and the darkest darks. If you’re having difficulty grasping how that translates into a more realistic image on your screen, think of the subtle tonal gradations a fine artist creates in a charcoal drawing to build the illusion of volume, mass, and texture, and you should begin to get the picture. But HDR doesn’t just improve grayscale; its greater luminance range opens up a video’s color palette as well. “Basically, it’s blacker blacks, whiter whites, and higher brightness and contrast levels for colors across the spectrum,” says Glenn Hower, a research analyst at Parks Associates.

The result is richer, more lifelike video images. Rather than washing out to white, as it would in conventional video, a ray of sunlight reflecting off a lake in HDR will gleam, and a bright cloud will appear soft and cottony. Basically any image your current TV would render shadowed, dull, muddy, or bleached out will look nuanced, vibrant, and strikingly realistic in HDR.

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techhive

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May 072015
 

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If you’ve shopped TVs recently, you’ve no doubt been seduced by the term 4K UHD (Ultra High Definition). When UHD was first introduced a few years ago, it represented a jump in resolution – basically four times the resolution of 1080p HD. That seemed like a pretty big deal, but we now know that, in 2015, UHD is taking on an entirely new meaning. Going forward, the very best UHD TVs will not only offer higher resolution, but also offer more colors than ever before and something called High Dynamic Range, or HDR.

The idea behind HDR is that it can provide a higher level of contrast between light and dark images on the screen to create a much more realistic image. That may not sound like a lot on paper, but in reality, it’s a pretty significant move. In fact, many in the industry believe HDR represents a significantly bigger leap in picture quality than UHD’s higher resolution.

Imagine a TV picture that is more like what you see in real life. One with spectral highlights closer to what you see when the sun gleams off the surface of a lake, or when the stars and moon are especially bright in the sky. Imagine getting to see the exact same shade of green you see on Los Angeles’ highway signs on a TV for the very first time (did you know TVs haven’t been able to faithfully produce that color?) or a shade of red envisioned by a movie director that is so bright and exotic, you’re convinced you’ve never seen it before. HDR makes that possible.



Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/hdr-for-tvs-explained/#ixzz3ZQ9S8KvL 
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Apr 242015
 

Looking to upgrade your 1080p TV to an Ultra High-Definition setup? Sony has opened pre-orders for some of the 4K UHD TV sets it showed off at CES.
Specifically, the X830C, X850C, X930C, and X940C come in sizes ranging from 43 to 75 inches, with prices starting at $1,300 all the way up to $8,000. Pre-orders are expected to ship in May.
The X830C series is the cheapest and smallest of the lot, measuring in at 43 inches or 49 inches, for $1,300 or $1,600, respectively. Then there’s the X850C, which is available in 55-inch, 65-inch, and 75-inch flavors for $2,199.99, $3,499.99, or $4,999.99.
For those who want the best of the best, Sony has the 65-inch X930C for $4,499.99 and the 75-inch X940C for a cool $7,999.99. Both of these models will be compatible with High Dynamic Range video, which can display a wider range of brightness levels for a more lifelike experience, via a network update this summer. Amazon and Netflix have both announced plans to embrace HDR video this year.
With HDR video, “customers can enjoy a peak brightness of LED as well as deeper blacks, providing them with a superior viewing experience compared to that of normal HDR video sources as well as any other video source,” Sony said.

Read more at:

pcmag.com

Apr 202015
 

Sony has revealed that contrary to early expectations, two series of its imminent 2015 4K TV range will be capable of playing high dynamic range (HDR) content.

The XBR X930C and X940C TV ranges, due to launch in May, will both offer compatibility with HDR’s enhanced luminance range. The feature won’t be available from the TVs’ launch, though – instead it will be added via a firmware update ‘this summer’.

At this year’s CES in January and then again at a launch event in the UK in February Sony originally implied that we’d have to wait for all-new sets in the second half of the year to deliver HDR compatibility. Clearly, though, Sony has come to believe that the X930C and X940C models (the ultra-slim X900 models are apparently not going to get the HDR treatment) have the picture quality muscle to deliver HDR’s spectacular impact.

The key to this lies in Sony’s X-Tended Dynamic Range technology, which manipulates the way power and light are distributed around the screen to boost bright areas and deepen black level response.

Neil King, Head of Home Entertainment for Sony UK and Ireland, has this to say about the HDR news: “Sony has always been the leader in 4K and our exclusive Sony technologies have been at the core of providing TV lovers with the best picture quality, no matter what content they are watching. Our decades of experience allow us to introduce merging industry standard HDR to our 4K Ultra HD TV series and to reinforce contrast thanks to Sony’s unique technology X-tended Dynamic Range PRO”.

While on the surface the addition of HDR to Sony’s imminent range seems like a welcome development, though – especially as it means there will be some competition for Samsung’s JS9500 (reviewed here) and JS9000 (reviewed here) HDR TVs – it has to be said that Sony’s announcement is rather light on detail.

In particular, there’s no word on exactly what HDR formats will be supported. You could argue that this is hardly Sony’s fault, as the AV industry still hasn’t fully defined HDR (though a trio of standards have been announced for the upcoming Ultra HD Blu-ray discs). But since Sony also offers no clarity on exactly what brightness levels or colour range the X930C and X940C TVs may be capable of delivering, simply saying the sets will be HDR compatible is pretty much as vague as it gets.

Read more:

Forbes

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Apr 172015
 

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Vizio announced earlier this week that it will be among the first TV manufacturers to ship sets that use the Dolby Vision high dynamic range imaging technology that Dolby Labs first showcased at CES—in 2014.

In fact, the TV manufacturer showed these same 4K displays way back then, captivating attendees and critics alike. The Vizio Reference Series—to be available in 65- and 120-inch screen sizes—pack Vizio’s own V6 hexa-core processor, dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and a built-in sound bar with two satellite speakers.

With Dolby Vision intended to be the biggest selling point for these new TVs, a brief description of the much-touted technology is in order. Despite consensus among various stakeholders that HDR is the next big step for TVs, the industry has yet to agree on a standard for HDR TVs and content. Dolby Vision is one of the technologies trying to fill that void.

You might want to put off that 4K TV purchase for a few more months.

According to Dolby, this is an “end-to-end” solution meant for everyone from content creators to over-the-top (OTT) providers to TV manufacturers. Dolby Vision combines a high dynamic range with an extended color gamut to deliver more vibrant and realistic images.

A TV’s dynamic range or contrast ratio, for those who don’t know, describes the contrast between its darkest blacks and brightest whites. The higher the dynamic range and the wider the color palette, the more realistic the image tends to look.

Read More:

techhive

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Apr 152015
 

 

 

While still leaving many questions unanswered, Technicolor is using this week’s National Association of Broadcasters Show to reveal more of its plans to support high dynamic range, a feature that expands the range between the whitest whites and blackest blacks that can be seen on a TV or movie screen.

Announced steps include HDR color grading services for movies, TV shows and commercials. Also, the company plans to license what it calls an Intelligent Tone Management plug-in, developed to help broadcasters to create HDR content in their own facilities.

Hollywood is interested in HDR, but a challenge to a rollout is that various, some proprietary, formats are appearing.

Technicolor said its color grading services would launch in Los Angeles in June, supporting the HDR guidelines set by the UHD Alliance, an industry coalition that includes most of the Hollywood studios. Those guidelines, however, have not yet been set; Technicolor is hopeful something might be in place in the foreseeable future.

The Intelligent Tone Management plug-in was created to analyze video in real time and provide colorists with more control of luminance in the shadows, mid-tones and highlights. The company plans to license the plug-in, which is being tested with a planned release in June.

At NAB, Autodesk is demoing the plug-in with the Autodesk Lustre color grading system and Blackmagic Design, with its DaVinci Resolve color grading software. FilmLight also is planning support for its Baselight grading system.

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hollywoodreporter

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Apr 142015
 

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Since its introduction, Amazon’s Prime Instant Video service has been playing fast-follower to Netflix. Not long after Netflix announced it was diving into producing original series, Amazon said it was doing the same; Netflix barreled into 4K UHD resolution, and shortly thereafter, Amazon did too. Today we see that trend continuing as Amazon announces that its original series will soon be the first titles from the service to be offered up in High Dynamic Range.

But what does that even mean?

For those unfamiliar, High Dynamic Range is one of the latest buzzwords to hit TV tech — some even say it is a more visually impressive evolution of TV picture quality than 4K resolution. Often referred to as HDR, this new feature in video imagery is designed to allow striking contrast between light and dark images, creating a dazzling picture that aims to model what we see in the natural world under the illumination of sunlight.

Read more: 

Digitaltrends.com

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