Oct 312014
 
Please click the image below to download the free trial version:

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To purchase HDR Express 3 with your HDR360pro discount,
please click the image below:

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HDR Photography Beyond Your Imagination

Capturing a high contrast scene has always vexed photographers. We’ve all tried neutral density filters for landscapes and lighting equipment for interior shots in order to balance the wide range of light levels in our scenes. The results could be good but the work to get to the final image was intense. No longer!

Capturing high contrast scenes is now as simple as shooting three or more images of varying exposures and then merging those images into one high dynamic range file that reveals all your shadows and highlights. The magic is done with HDR software. But, not all HDR software is created equal.

Previously, HDR applications performed their contrast manipulation or “tone mapping” by creating an 8-bit or 16-bit image. Using an 8-bit or 16-bit file to create a large, high dynamic range file significantly reduces the file’s dynamic range, clips its color range and degrades the precision of image data.

That’s why we created our stand-alone HDR applications HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and the Photoshop plug-in 32 Float v3. These are the only HDR applications that merge multiple exposures into a full 32-bit file using our patented Beyond RGB™ color model. And, most importantly, these are the only HDR photo editing applications where all tools and operations work in 32-bit, floating-point precision.

Creating an HDR Image – One Click or Total Control

HDR Expose 3 and HDR Express 2 use powerful image alignment algorithms to create an HDR image from multiple exposures. The resulting 32-bit image is then ready to have its wide contrast range adjusted to fit into the contrast range of your output device. Unlike other HDR applications which “tone map” their 8-bit or 16-bit image into a useable range, our applications take all the valuable data in your HDR image and “dynamic range map” it into a file that retains naturally clear highlights, vibrant mid-tones and beautifully open shadows.

HDR Expose 3 and HDR Express 2 can do this for you with a single click using the Dynamic Range Mapping tool. And, with HDR Express you have additional one-step tone mapping and style preset buttons. You can also choose to have full control over the mapping process by individually adjusting the image’s dynamic range, brightness, highlights, shadows and saturation. With these powerful tools you can dial in a beautifully natural HDR image or a highly stylized image depending on your artistic vision.

Advantages of Working in 32-bit Mode in the Beyond RGB Color Space

In digital photography the colors and brightness of each pixel are recorded as binary numbers. Depending on the power of your image editing application the numbers used to describe those pixels are restricted to 8-bits (256) or 16-bits (65,535). Naturally, the more numbers you have available to you the more variation you can describe in each pixel. The more variation that you can describe, the richer and more detailed your digital image will be.

Because color information is restricted to at most 16 bits in the RGB space used in most image editing applications and output devices, RGB is inherently a restricted color model — it is a restricted color space that cannot describe all the colors that can be seen by the human eye.

Imagine the tonal variations available to you by working in 32-bit, floating point mode in the Beyond RGB color space, the basis of HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3. The Beyond RGB color space brings all the colors your eye can see to the task of creating your HDR photography image.

Because the 32-bit floating point Beyond RGB color model is not based on the RGB model, the brightness and contrast changes made to your image in HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 or 32 Float v3 will not alter your original colors as you would in an 8-bit or 16-bit program.

In fact, every tool and operation in HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3 always works in the high-precision 32-bit floating point mode. This is why many pro photographers are using HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3 to perform non-color-destructive brightness, contrast and color adjustments to their non-HDR images. These pros create their images from RAW camera files and save out their files in 32-bit format as a base reference file before moving on to Photoshop or other programs for further editing. Why lose data before you have to? Why lose data at all?

It’s time for you to try HDR imaging and discover the beauty in a high dynamic range image and then working with that image in full, non-destructive 32-bit floating point mode. Download a free, 30-day trial version of HDR Expose 3 or HDR Express 2 today and experience the beauty of true HDR photography.

Oct 222014
 
I use Topaz Clarity often. Now you can save 25% with Coupon Code: octclarity

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 Topaz Labs Downloads

“Wow!”

That’s what you say as you capture a photo of a breathtaking sunset, so beautiful that you’ll remember it for the rest of your life.

“…wow.”

…and that’s all you can say when you find that your image doesn’t look so good at 100%. It’s not as vivid, as punchy, or as real as real life! You see the world in much better contrast and detail than your camera. After all, it’s difficult to express the beauty of the real world in a two-dimensional image.

We designed Topaz Clarity to solve this problem. Clarity’s micro-contrast technology helps you add punch to your photos while still keeping them natural. Instead of spending a lot of time manually brightening and darkening selective parts of your image, Clarity can do it all in a few clicks:

“It doesn’t matter if you’re shooting fashion, architecture, or landscapes, micro-contrast can make your images POP. You’ll jump up and down in your editing chair from joy. In short, Clarity ROCKS.”

Frank Doorhof, fashion/celebrity photographer

Aug 182014
 

“A new laser projector from Barco and the Dolby Vision high-dynamic range system are among the nominees for the International 3D & Advanced Imaging Society’s fifth annual Technology & New Product Awards, scheduled to be handed out Sept. 24 at Paramount.

Nominees also include a trifocal camera (pictured), that was jointly developed by Disney, camera maker Arri and the Fraunhofer research institute; a hybrid stereo pipeline developed by Prime Focus; and the 4DX motion seats that were recently installed in the new 4D theater at L.A. Live.”

Read more at the link below:

The Hollywood Reporter

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Aug 172014
 

“Does that weather photo seem too good to be true? It just might be.

High-dynamic-range (HDR) photo techniques have become popular over recent years. It’s not hard to see why, as the enhancements can create eye-popping imagery, even sometimes from relatively uninteresting scenes.

It’s a one stop shop to getting a photo noticed. Or at least that’s the impression some seem to have. Unfortunately, it very often goes too far.”

What is HDR (high-dynamic-range)?

HDR is a set of techniques to add light and color to the shadows and dark regions of a photographic image.  In addition, bright, over-exposed regions of a photograph are given rich color and darkened. In theory, this can better approximate what the eye is able to see and a camera cannot.

HDR can be done by software manipulation of a single photographic exposure or by merging multiple exposures into a single image file.  It has been increasingly popular with both skilled photographers and novices.”

To view full article please click the link below:

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Aug 132014
 

Just in case you missed your chance when onOne Software ran this deal the first time a few months back, the company is yet again giving away its Perfect Effects 8 Premium Edition software, usually $100, completely free in exchange for your email. Part of Perfect Photo Suite 8, Perfect Effect 8 is usually used alongside a RAW image editor like Lightroom. Because while there are a few basic editing options in there, the main draw of Perfect Effects is… well… the effects. More specifically: the presets. The premium edition offers 23 groups of presets, with more than 100 different presets total.

To view full article please click the link below:

PETAPIXEL

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Aug 082014
 

“It seems pretty clear that smartphones have become the point-and-shoots of our time.  The latest smartphone cams on the market have resolutions up to 41 megapixels, well more than the 10Mp of my old Canon PowerShot S90.  Even the average top-end smartphone sports a lens that delivers at least 16Mp.”

“So, other than driving the point-and-shoot guys out of business, what have they achieved, these super-cam smartphones?  Well, a lot, and they’re going to do more.”

“Now, 16Mp will support any format of the new 4K displays, which have roughly 4,000 pixels along the horizontal edge.  In fact, depending on the standard, they can vary from 3,840 to 5,120, and have anywhere from ~7Mp up to ~16.3Mp total, but the standard for ultra high definition television (UHDTV) uses just a bit more than 8Mp.”

To view full article please click the link below:

FORBES

Hanchard-Goodwin

Aug 072014
 

“What’s a photograph? If you answered: “a moment in time captured on film or as a digital image” your answer would only be right for the last hundred years or so. Back in 1839, when the Daguerreotype process was announced to the world, an exposure on a glass positive would take 20-30 minutes. When, two years later, Henry Fox Talbot introduced his calotype method of creating a film negative, the exposures were shorter, but still measured in minutes, not seconds or fractions of a second.”

“So, with either method, what was captured was the accreation of time stacked, chemical reaction by chemical reaction, on an exposed plate. Early photographs are a hearty slice of time, not a unique, frozen sliver. The images they catch never really existed as we see them now. They are collapsed movies.”

To view full article please click the link below:

RABBLE

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Aug 042014
 

“One of the features in HDR Expose 3 our customers tell us outperforms our competition is the Merge Key Frame feature that makes de-ghosting amazingly accurate. In this image, taken after sunset, of a young couple drinking in Half Dome at Yosemite’s Glacier Point gives a great illustration. In the middle of frame of the three-frame bracket sequence the young woman on the right turned her head to look at her boyfriend. I selected a frame where she was looking at Half Dome as the key frame and Expose 3 eliminated the movement. Really neat!”

– John Santoro

“The following image,  of Half Dome at sunset, shows HDR Expose 3 delivering truly natural HDR processing results.”

To read full article please click the link below:

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Image by John Santoro

To download the trial version or to order, click here or on the image below.
Be sure to enter discount code: “HDR360pro” to save 10% on HDR Expose 3.1

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Jul 302014
 

This new phone was released in China but not here in the USA. I think the camera with it’s video HDR capability is interesting in that it also features 4K resolution. It sounds like the Sony sensor that has been mentioned for the iPhone 6. We will have to wait a while to find out…

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“Xiaomi finally unwrapped its much talked about beauty, the Mi 4, at a huge event earlier today. While the device is still not official for the United States and Europe, there are hopes that the Chinese favorite will get to the bigger markets too with its amazing features and a fighting specifications list. The smartphone is at par in terms of features with the other primary flagships that we usually talk about, however, what is the cherry of this features’ list is the Xiaomi Mi 4 camera! At 13 megapixel, the rear shooter uses a new Sony sensor that not only makes low-light photography a real charm, but also tackles with earlier issues of recording and HDR photography.

Xiaomi Mi 4 has launched today with a 13 megapixel primary shooter with a wide f/1.8 aperture. Xiaomi Mi 4 camera features a new Sony sensor IMX214 which is a BSI stacked CMOS sensor with a 1/3.06″. The new Sony sensor is a much improved sensor than the last generation IMX135 that was used in many flagships including the Samsung Galaxy S4 and the LG G3.
The major, and perhaps the most pleasing news for many consumers, is the improvement that the sensor offers for low-light photography. Because the Sony IMX214 is more sensitive and has less color crosstalk, it significantly improves low-light photography and produces better color-balanced images. The smartphone has improved the low-light photography department by taking a flash-less image along with another with flash, combining both to get both lit-up and much more natural looking images. The shooter also has a post-capture image refocus mode which seems quite handy along with a very easy exposure adjustment interface when you open the camera.”

Read full article: WCCFtech.com

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Jul 292014
 

Our friend Klaus Herrmann has created a terrific introduction to the fusion real estate method.

To read the article please click the link below:

Farbspiel Photography

Jul 232014
 
This video looks best at 1080p

There are many of us who sigh at hearing the dreaded acronym, HDR. Oftentimes we associate it with oversaturated, cartoon-like compositions put together from half a dozen worth of frames. But that’s not the only way to approach HDR. As with everything, it’s a variable, not definitive.

In the above video, Washington DC-based photographer Tim Cooper shows off how to effectively capture an HDR image. And he does so in such a manner that it replicates what the human eye sees, without over-processing as we all too often see.

To read the full article please click the link below.

PetaPixel

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May 252014
 
Click the image below to view the Immersive HDR panorama:

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May 252014
 

In this webinar photographer Richard Sisk demonstrates how to create stunning HDR Panoramas using the new Pano Prep Batch Processing feature in HDR Expose 3.1 and 3rd party stitching applications.

May 122014
 

HDRexpose3.1

 

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Belmont, CA (PRWEB) May 12, 2014

Unified Color Technologies, the experts in high dynamic range imaging (HDR), today announced HDR Expose 3.1, a significant update to its standalone HDR image processing software. HDR Expose 3.1’s newest features, including faster merge and alignment tools, improved de-ghosting algorithms, a new panorama batch processing assist mode and a redesigned merge dialog, are designed to optimize any photographers’ HDR workflow and efficiently produce, high-quality, true color HDR images.

“I have been photographing panoramas commercially for over 20 years,” said Richard Sisk, founder of Richard Sisk Productions. “Whether shooting film or digital, creating accurate reproductions of high contrast scenes has always been a challenge. The new Pano Prep Batch Processing feature of HDR Expose 3.1 not only provides a big productivity boost, but also helps me achieve the best quality results using my RAW image files and Unified Color’s 32-bit Beyond RGB HDR workflow. With HDR Expose, I am able to create universal tone mapped 16-bit TIFF files for each panel of the scene, that I can then stitch together for seamless results, using my favorite panorama software.”

“We have consistently worked to change photographers’ views of HDR image processing and introduce new tools for unlocking creativity,” said John Omvik, vice president of marketing for Unified Color Technologies. “The strike against HDR photography has been that the process of creating the most high quality images was time-consuming and stressed the resources of even the most powerful computer systems. We developed HDR Expose 3.1 to make HDR processing faster, smoother and simpler, and to stretch the boundaries of what’s been thought possible in the past.”

HDR Expose 3.1’s full features include:

New Panorama Batch Processing assist mode – HDR merge individual panels of a panoramic scene and tone map them as a group to provide even, consistent output that can be stitched into a wide panorama (or 360° panorama using 3rd party applications)
Faster Merge & Alignment – Seamlessly merge images up to 35% faster* than in previous versions
Improved de-ghosting algorithms – New manual controls offer more flexibility minimizing noise and removing ghost artifacts from moving subjects
Redesigned Merge dialog – Makes grouping images for the merge process and selecting key frames easier than ever before
DNG source filter option – Now filters DNG files separately from other RAW file formats
Bug fixes and other optimizations

Read more: 

 

Mar 112014
 

Please click link below to read the fill article at PetaPixel.com

Apple Adds Auto HDR to iOS 7.1… If You Have an iPhone 5S

Feb 112014
 

Google+ Photos caters to pixel peepers and HDR fans | Internet & Media – CNET News

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Two new options expand what’s possible with online photo editing on Google+.

You can check focus with 100 percent zoom and give photos an HDR look.

Feb 022014
 

Try Photomatix Pro 5 Free!

Here’s how:

Visit the Photomatix Download site:

Download HDR photography software Photomatix

Download the Photomatix Pro trial version for Windows or Mac.

If you decide to purchase, enter the coupon code:

“HDR360pro”

to receive the special 15% discount for readers of HDR360pro.com.

The coupon code may be applied to any of the Photomatix variations.

Please check out Farbspiel Photography for more great videos and information from Klaus Herrmann:

farbspiel photography – View. Learn. Connect.

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Jan 082014
 

Click the link below to read the full article in The Hollywood Reporter:

CES: Technicolor Taking on Dolby Vision With High Dynamic Range Imaging System

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Technicolor and Dreamworks Animation’s 4K streaming service

“LAS VEGAS — Technicolor is presenting a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging technology demonstration with an eye toward improving the consumer viewing experience – effectively taking on Dolby’s newly announced Dolby Vision, which is another development aimed at offering higher dynamic range to create better pictures, whether for HD or 4K content.” – The Hollywood Reporter

Technicolor – Technology-driven company for Media & Entertainment

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Jan 022014
 
See the full article at the link below:
Behind the scenes with Dolby’s new HDR TV tech | TV and Home Theater – CNET Reviews

“While the majority of the TV industry prattles on about higher and higher resolutions, few talk about improving other,

more important aspects of the TVs picture: contrast ratio and color.

Dolby, though best known for its audio technologies, has been doing a lot with video recently too.

The latest development addresses dynamic range, or difference between light and dark, for televisions.

The company says it wants to enhance not just contrast ratios, but the richness and realism of color as well.”

-Geoffrey Morrison, CNET