Oct 312014
 

In this tutorial John Omvik demonstrates the basic Adobe Lightroom workflow using the HDR Express 3 plug-in with the full workflow to produce natural looking tone mapped images from high contrast (HDR) scenes.

To purchase HDR Express 3 with your HDR360pro discount,
please click the image below:

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Oct 312014
 
Please click the image below to download the free trial version:

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To purchase HDR Express 3 with your HDR360pro discount,
please click the image below:

express3_box_prodpg

HDR Photography Beyond Your Imagination

Capturing a high contrast scene has always vexed photographers. We’ve all tried neutral density filters for landscapes and lighting equipment for interior shots in order to balance the wide range of light levels in our scenes. The results could be good but the work to get to the final image was intense. No longer!

Capturing high contrast scenes is now as simple as shooting three or more images of varying exposures and then merging those images into one high dynamic range file that reveals all your shadows and highlights. The magic is done with HDR software. But, not all HDR software is created equal.

Previously, HDR applications performed their contrast manipulation or “tone mapping” by creating an 8-bit or 16-bit image. Using an 8-bit or 16-bit file to create a large, high dynamic range file significantly reduces the file’s dynamic range, clips its color range and degrades the precision of image data.

That’s why we created our stand-alone HDR applications HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and the Photoshop plug-in 32 Float v3. These are the only HDR applications that merge multiple exposures into a full 32-bit file using our patented Beyond RGB™ color model. And, most importantly, these are the only HDR photo editing applications where all tools and operations work in 32-bit, floating-point precision.

Creating an HDR Image – One Click or Total Control

HDR Expose 3 and HDR Express 2 use powerful image alignment algorithms to create an HDR image from multiple exposures. The resulting 32-bit image is then ready to have its wide contrast range adjusted to fit into the contrast range of your output device. Unlike other HDR applications which “tone map” their 8-bit or 16-bit image into a useable range, our applications take all the valuable data in your HDR image and “dynamic range map” it into a file that retains naturally clear highlights, vibrant mid-tones and beautifully open shadows.

HDR Expose 3 and HDR Express 2 can do this for you with a single click using the Dynamic Range Mapping tool. And, with HDR Express you have additional one-step tone mapping and style preset buttons. You can also choose to have full control over the mapping process by individually adjusting the image’s dynamic range, brightness, highlights, shadows and saturation. With these powerful tools you can dial in a beautifully natural HDR image or a highly stylized image depending on your artistic vision.

Advantages of Working in 32-bit Mode in the Beyond RGB Color Space

In digital photography the colors and brightness of each pixel are recorded as binary numbers. Depending on the power of your image editing application the numbers used to describe those pixels are restricted to 8-bits (256) or 16-bits (65,535). Naturally, the more numbers you have available to you the more variation you can describe in each pixel. The more variation that you can describe, the richer and more detailed your digital image will be.

Because color information is restricted to at most 16 bits in the RGB space used in most image editing applications and output devices, RGB is inherently a restricted color model — it is a restricted color space that cannot describe all the colors that can be seen by the human eye.

Imagine the tonal variations available to you by working in 32-bit, floating point mode in the Beyond RGB color space, the basis of HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3. The Beyond RGB color space brings all the colors your eye can see to the task of creating your HDR photography image.

Because the 32-bit floating point Beyond RGB color model is not based on the RGB model, the brightness and contrast changes made to your image in HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 or 32 Float v3 will not alter your original colors as you would in an 8-bit or 16-bit program.

In fact, every tool and operation in HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3 always works in the high-precision 32-bit floating point mode. This is why many pro photographers are using HDR Expose 3, HDR Express 2 and 32 Float v3 to perform non-color-destructive brightness, contrast and color adjustments to their non-HDR images. These pros create their images from RAW camera files and save out their files in 32-bit format as a base reference file before moving on to Photoshop or other programs for further editing. Why lose data before you have to? Why lose data at all?

It’s time for you to try HDR imaging and discover the beauty in a high dynamic range image and then working with that image in full, non-destructive 32-bit floating point mode. Download a free, 30-day trial version of HDR Expose 3 or HDR Express 2 today and experience the beauty of true HDR photography.

Oct 302014
 

Frequency separation helps make retouching a portrait easier in Photoshop. Frequency separation works because it allows you to separate the texture of an image from the tone and color. When retouching you can focus on just the texture or the skin beneath it.

For more info please click the link below:

phlearn

Oct 282014
 

Camera+ has to be one of my favorite iPhone apps to use when I use my phone to take a quick picture. Its interface provides ample versatility with speed, pro-functions and editing capabilities. I’m not the only one praising this iPhone app – Camera+ has sold over 10 million copies, and is one of the most well-liked third party camera apps out there.

Camera+ regularly costs $3 at the App Store, but now you can snag it for free, and only for a limited time– the offer ends November 16th.

To view full article please click the link below:

slrlounge
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Oct 282014
 

Between now and January 31st of 2015, those interested in switching up your post-processing workflow and experimenting with software outside of the Adobe ecosystem have a great incentive to do so: DxO has partnered with Digital Photographer to offer free, no strings attached licenses of DxO Optics Pro 8 to anybody who wants one.

I have been a longtime user of DXO OpticPro and in my view it is excellent.

To view full article please click the link below:

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Oct 272014
 

Probably one of the biggest complaints I have heard in regards to Canon’s two latest big releases, the 7D Mark II and the C100 Mark II, is the lack of 4K video recording. Well, it seems that Canon may finally be seeing the light about 4K, and a new rumor indicates it could be coming soon!

To view full article please click the link below:

slrlounge

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Oct 252014
 

I enjoyed this very creative look at some classic album covers combined cleverly with a bit of animation and music!

Made out of love and admiration for all the musicians and visual artists who’s art we grew up listening to and staring at.

Directing, Writing, Cinematography, Editing, and VFX: Vania Heymann.
Music by Roy Kafri.
Producing, Co­-writing and other stuff: Natan Schottenfels
Color: Tal Baltuch
“Revolver“ Animation: Yoav Shtibelman
Wardrobe: Mayan Toledano
Roy’s “Acowpella Beatbox” album at: roykafri.bandcamp.com/
Actors: Patrick Griffith, Martin Pfefferkorn
Faces: Ben Bocker, Maya Ish Shalom, Gal Muggia, Anaelle Heymann, Yael Friedlander, Daniel Koren, Tom Metcalfe, Anisia Affek, Mark Coates, Yoav L. Wazana, Dan Farkas, Yinka Parris, Si Koroma, Alma Beck and Lazar Farkas the cat
Music Credits-
Composed by Roy Kafri
All Vocals by Roy Kafri
Mixed by Ori Shochat
Special Thanks to: Daniela Albin, Anisia Affek, Omri Anghel, Dan Farkas, Daniel Koren, Gal Muggia and Maya Ish Shalom
Roy Kafri’s Channel: youtube.com/user/roykafri

Oct 232014
 

Michael “Nick” Nichols tracked the pride of big cats for six months before capturing this stunning shot, which stretches all the way to the horizon and includes a dramatic African sky.

The great sense of depth is enhanced by the use of infrared, which cuts through the haze.

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MICHAEL “NICK” NICHOLS

WPY is 50 years old this year.

Supported from the outset by the BBC, it has grown into one of the world’s foremost photo competitions.

Strong narrative 

Judge Magdalena Herrera is director of photography at GEO France, as well as being a veteran of National Geographic France.

She said American Nichols’ composition had all the elements of a perfect picture.

“It tells you about behaviour, about the photographic techniques today, and it shows you the relationship of the animal to its environment,” she told BBC News.

“What is striking about Nick’s picture is its narrative – it’s not just a portrait; there’s a whole story going on inside it. And the black and white gives it a feeling of reportage.”

This story is of the females of the Vumbi pride in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park.

Female force

They are sleeping with their cubs in the late-afternoon sunshine, having just fought and driven off a couple of over inquisitive males.

Nichols caught the scene, which he calls The Last Great Picture, from on top of his vehicle.

He said the infrared transformed the light, turning “The moment into something primal, biblical almost”.

Three of the females were killed a few months later when the pride ventured on to land beyond the park.

For more information and great images, please click the link below:

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