Aug 042015
 

Sony’s new A7rII is the first in the A7 family to record video in a 4K (UHD) quality internally. My colleague Sebastian Wöber already preformed a preliminary LAB test to the camera and found the quality in APS C (super 35) mode to be sightly better than in the full frame mode (exactly like Sony predicted). In this video I used both shooting modes and I dare you to spot the different between them….(1:45 to 1:51 is a good example).

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cinema5d

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Jul 312015
 

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It appears that Nikon is on the verge of announcing three new Nikkor lenses. Newly leaked photos and specs received and published by the Japanese website Digicam-inforeveal an upcoming 24-70mm f/2.8 VR, 24mm f/1.8, and 200-500mm f/5.6 VR.

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petapixel

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Jul 312015
 

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High dynamic range (HDR) is the next big thing in both movies and TVs. We’ve seen 4K in the cinema and ultra HD arrive in our homes, with more and more content for both appearing. Now Technicolor is getting behind the tech, and is offering a way to both back-render standard range (SDR) content as well as stream full HDR video.

HDR is the visually rich step up from UHD fidelity which the move from 1080p to 4K simply hasn’t been.

Essentially, HDR is designed to give far more depth to an image, offering more range to colours and more detail to shadows. Imagine a ray of sunlight in a variety of orange and yellow hues rather than just straight white light.

It makes things pop.

I recently checked out Dolby Vision, that company’s proprietary HDR tech, at a screening of Pixar’s Inside Out and it was stunning. Having seen an SDR version of the movie now, and how flat the iridescent colours look by comparison, I’m sold.

Technicolor, though, is claiming its HDR tech is both open and able to be applied to SDR content for a high dynamic range upscale. It’s also planned to be one of the HDR options available to the upcoming Ultra HD Blu-ray specification.

That alone will massively boost the amount of HDR content available.

The upscaling gives content providers real-time access to the colour information in a video, allowing for direct control over both the highlights, lowlights and mid-tones. As well as being able to apply this to existing content there’s speculation that it could work for live events, such as sport, too.

Quite how the upscaling will compare with full HDR content, only time will tell.

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techradar

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Jul 302015
 

This is quite amazing… Be sure to check out the “Making of” video!

Last week, Teton Gravity Research (TGR) and Anthill Films released one of the most acclaimed segments from unReal, Brandon Semenuk’s “One Shot” segment. It’s the first full segment in a mountain bike film shot in a single, continuous shot. The beautiful simplicity of the segment hides the extraordinary amount of work and coordination it took from the entire team to create. In this episode of Mind the Gap, we go behind the scenes in Cambria, California to show you how the crew pulled off this cinematic achievement.

Download unReal:
iTunes – http://radi.al/unReal
GooglePlay – http://radi.al/1OWN
MGo – http://radi.al/2qar
Amazon Instant Video – http://radi.al/3NL2
Playstation – http://radi.al/fs0

 

Jul 292015
 

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Last month, I took the Nikon D810 out on the Sierra High Route — one of the toughest adventures around. It got dirty, wet, and constantly banged around. Here’s how it performed.

Three years ago, my roommate bought a D800E. I’ve always shot Canon, but he let me borrow his Nikon for a couple of shoots. It was impressive to say the least. I vowed that when it was time for me to upgrade from my 5D Mk II, if Canon hadn’t released a comparable body, that I would give the D800 a shot.

Fast forward to this past April. While riding a $450 motorcycle through Vietnam, I lost my backpack with everything in it — including my trusty, dusty Canon 5D Mk II, and the only piece of glass that mattered. I started doing research on the current SLR market. Nothing out there seemed that impressive or able to meet the intensive demands of adventure photography — including the (at the time) recently-announced 5DS. That is, until I ran across the recently released 36 megapixel Nikon D810 ($3,000 Body Only.) It was time to give it a shot.

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indefinitelywild

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Jul 292015
 

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Dolby Cinema includes the Dolby Vision high dynamic range format and Dolby Atmos sound.

Mission: Impossible—Rogue Nation will be the first Paramount release that will have a version made specifically for Dolby Cinema, a premium large-format theater experience that includes Dolby’s newfangled Dolby Vision high dynamic range format as well as Dolby Atmos immersive sound.

This version can be seen in theaters that are playing the film and are equipped to handle the format. Dolby Cinema or Dolby Vision projection is currently installed at roughly 10 cinema auditoriums worldwide, plus early Dolby Cinema at AMC Prime locations (roughly 100 Prime locations are expected to be converted by 2024).

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hollywoodreporter

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Jul 282015
 

beforeafter2

Adobe’s new Dehaze slider has been wowing photographers since it was launched for Lightroom and Adobe Camera RAW last month. We’ve seen what it can do for haze, rainy days, and blizzards, but there’s yet another interesting application: enhancing photos of the starry night sky.

New Zealand-based photographer Tom Mackintosh recently did some casual experiments with this late one night from the outer suburbs of Auckland, where light pollution still affects his view of the sky.

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petapixel

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