Jul 192016
 

The new XEEN 135mm T2.2 lens just announced by Samyang is the latest addition to their rugged, 4K-capable line-up. After successive releases of the 14mm and 35mm XEEN lenses earlier in the year, this completes the line up of premium optics from Samyang, the infiltrator of the cinema optics market.

The new XEEN 135mm boasts a T2.2 aperture, which is nearly equivalent to F2, a perfect focal length for intimate portrait shots of subjects. Not limited to Canon EF or Nikon F mount, the lenses are also available in PL, Sony E and MFT mounts also.

The minimum focus distance on the spec sheet of the XEEN 135mm is 0.8m, but as displayed on the image of the lens itself, it’s 2.9 feet, which is roughly 88cm. This is closer than the Zeiss CP.2 135mm, which comes in at 1m.

Unsurprisingly, it is also the heaviest lens in the range, weighing 1.382kg, although that is not a surprise considering the full metal body.

The XEEN range is designed for inter-operability, allowing the quick and easy switching with other XEEN lenses without adjusting your current setup, whether that be matte boxes, follow focus or the camera itself.

There is no mention of price, but as all the other lenses in the range are priced at £2495 (£1600), I would assume the price would follow suit. There is no release date for the 135mm model yet, but expect news from IBC and Photokina with more info!

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cinema5d

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Jul 192016
 

Full Frame Comparison

Since I got my Nikon D7000 camera 6 years ago I’ve used it almost everyday. That is a lot of shutter clicks, 148,558 to be exact. It looks like I will be in the market for a new camera soon as the D7000 is only factory tested to 150,000 clicks. My dilemma is should I go full frame, or stick with my cropped frame?

I keep asking myself, is a full frame camera really worth it? I took a Nikon full frame D610 and a Nikon cropped frame D7100 on a test drive around Paris to see the real world differences.

What exactly is a “full frame” camera?

Film was the unchallenged king for a century and the most popular format was 35mm film. It was sometimes referred to as “small format” to differentiate it from “medium format” or “large format” cameras, but for most of us it was the standard film we used. Although called 35mm, it actually measured 36x24mm.

When they started making digital cameras they used a smaller sensor than their film counterparts, roughly 24x16mm, but the bodies still took advantage of the same 35mm lens. The smaller sensor size meant there was a part of the image that never made it to the smaller sensor. About a decade ago, developers in Japan decided to increase the size of their sensors to the equivalent of 35mm film and as a very cleaver marketing ploy, called them “full frame” renaming their current cameras as merely “cropped frame.”

Makes you feel like you’re missing out right? Lets take a look at some of the key differences.

Full Frame Comparison

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petapixel

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Jul 192016
 

pexels-photo-large

If you’re like me, you’re constantly looking to improve and expand your referral base. Once you’ve got a good number of weddings under your belt your base will be made up of (mostly) previous couples.

Every wedding you shoot is another set of potential clients down the road. Members of the wedding party, their family members, friends and guests of the couple… these are the people who will hopefully come to you in the future when they themselves are looking for a wedding photographer.

So how do you get it all going? For a lot of photographers, getting work in the beginning is like the chicken or the egg. You need weddings to get weddings. So where’s the break in the loop?

It’s important to understand the order of the referral tree. This is where “gravity” comes into play. It’s also where photographers who are just starting out are at a bit of a disadvantage.

While it can certainly vary couple-to-couple, the booking order usually goes something like this:

1. Ring
2. Venue / Date
3. Photographer
4. DJ / Band
5. Catering (if not provided by the venue)
6. DJ
7. Florist
8. Dress shop
9. Justice of Peace (if necessary)
10. Videographer (I don’t agree with the tendency to book video late, but it seems to be the trend)
11. Misc vendors (drapery, lighting, candy buffets, photo booth, cocktail hour trios, etc)

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petapixel

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Jul 142016
 

SLR Magic Anamorphot-Cine Lenses are a set of vintage look anamorphics. I had a chance to review the set, producing the above short film shot exclusively on them.
I haven’t done a personal project for a while, so when the opportunity to do one came about, I wanted to try something completely new from a technical perspective. You can read more about the project itself here.
I had never used anamorphic lenses on a full project before, so when the SLR Magic Anamorphot-Cine surfaced some months ago I was naturally very intrigued.
Anamorphic image capture is not as straight forward as spherical, despite growing in popularity and accessibility, much like every other piece of technology these days. Affordable, reliable, genuine anamorphic lensing are still relatively hard to come by.

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cinema5d

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Jul 142016
 

The Polaroid brand has launched a new free mobile app called Polaroid Swing. It’s “an innovative moving photo app” that opens the door to a “new visual medium for the mobile era.”

The app was created by a partnership between the Polaroid brand and a tech startup chaired by Twitter co-founder Biz Stone.

Using the app, you can capture moving photos, or one-second moments that come to life when you touch the static photo or swing your phone around. The concept is similar to the Live Photos feature built into Apple’s latest iPhones.

polaroidswinghead

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petapixel

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Jul 142016
 

DJI just announced the introduction of a drone zoom camera called the DJI Zenmuse Z3. It is an upgrade to the popular Zenmuse X3, which is their entry level integrated drone camera used on the DJI Inspire 1 and DJI Osmo.

The Zenmuse Z3 will offer a zoom of up to 7x. That is a 3.5x optical zoom with a digital scaler doing the rest. Although the press release indicates this zoom camera is aimed mainly at industrial applications such as inspection and surveying, it certainly also gives filmmakers interesting new possibilities. A different focal length can come in handy in many filming situations.

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cinema5d

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Jul 032016
 

Time-lapse photographer Rufus Blackwell spent the last 2 months taking the DJI Osmo handheld stabilized camera around Saigon, Vietnam. The 3-minute video above is what resulted.

djiosmoproduct

“Because the camera is so steady, you can create hyperlapse sequences from shooting video, a completely new way of creating a moving timelapse,” Blackwell tells PetaPixel. “This allows you so much latitude in post, you can warp time. This was a highly experimental shoot, I was amazed by the results.”

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petapixel.com

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