Jan 272015
 

I have watched this several times and am in absolute awe of the talent on display here!

Jan 272015
 

Nikon and The Telegraph recently partnered up for a campaign titled “I Am Different.” It’s a series of short videos showing how 5 different photographers are using their Nikon DSLR in various niches of photography.

Jan 232015
 

If you have been in the business for a while as a cameraman already, you might remember a time when there were cameras that you could just pick up for the first time “out of the box” or from the TV station that hired you and you were able to use it “as is”.

Nowadays, the amount of different camera brands and models that we are using as professionals on a daily basis is constantly increasing. The average professional has a number of different cameras he’s working with, or hires them on occasion. There isn’t “one camera for the right job”, there’s loads of different ones for loads of different purposes.
For example, I still use my Canon C300 for many broadcast jobs as it’s an extremely popular camera with a beautiful image. Since it was released, I have also become a big fan of the Sony A7s, an amazingly small full frame camera with the most insane low light capability you have ever seen. I also ordered the Sony FS7, which will be my first permanent foray into 4K filmmaking, and I frequently hire an F55 or Red Epic or Dragon for higher end jobs. And sometimes (rarely though) I am even forced to work with traditional shoulder-mount broadcast cameras like the Sony PXW-800.

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cinema5d

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Jan 222015
 

image

He says, as a closing statement, that he hopes this tutorial has inspired you to explore blend modes more. He, is Jimmy McIntyre, and he needn’t hope, because it has, and I’ll bet for you it will. In near-as-makes-no-difference 7 minutes, McIntyre illustrates how incredibly powerful Photoshop blend modes are, and how fast they can be manipulated for effect.

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slrlounge

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Jan 222015
 

Jan 212015
 

What makes a film a classic? It is not about whether it was shot in 4k on a Arri Alexa or it was shot on an 16mm Bolex. What all classic films have in common is that they convey a certain emotion. The technical aspects of cinematography can be learned by anyone, but to capture an emotion and move the audience is what real cinematographers are about. The short documentary, ‘Light & Shadow,’ reminds us that you don’t make movies; you make films.

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slrlounge

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Jan 212015
 

1. Always take the initiative.
2. There is nothing wrong with spending a night in jail if it means getting the shot you need.
3. Send out all your dogs and one might return with prey.
4. Never wallow in your troubles; despair must be kept private and brief.
5. Learn to live with your mistakes.
6. Expand your knowledge and understanding of music and literature, old and modern.
7. That roll of unexposed celluloid you have in your hand might be the last in existence, so do something impressive with it.
8. There is never an excuse not to finish a film.
9. Carry bolt cutters everywhere.
10. Thwart institutional cowardice.
11. Ask for forgiveness, not permission.
12. Take your fate into your own hands.
13. Learn to read the inner essence of a landscape.
14. Ignite the fire within and explore unknown territory.
15. Walk straight ahead, never detour.
16. Manoeuvre and mislead, but always deliver.
17. Don’t be fearful of rejection.
18. Develop your own voice.
19. Day one is the point of no return.
20. A badge of honor is to fail a film theory class.
21. Chance is the lifeblood of cinema.
22. Guerrilla tactics are best.
23. Take revenge if need be.
24. Get used to the bear behind you.

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joblo
Jan 212015
 

In this tutorial we talk about photographing the constellation Orion, stacking multiple astrophotography exposures to reduce noise and enhancing nebulosity with the LRGB Processing method using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom.

— Ian Norman