KipperTie Revolva – RED Lens Mount With Built In ND Filter Wheel

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on KipperTie Revolva – RED Lens Mount With Built In ND Filter Wheel
Dec 102017
 

KipperTie has announced Revolva, a new mount for the DSMC2 RED cameras offering a PL or EF mount with built-in ND wheel. The wheel can be swapped out quickly to more ND or even a diffusion set.

Kippertie has been known for making filtration-related RED products for some time. The Revolva may just be their most significant yet.

With a name and colour wave akin to another favourite UK camera accessory company, the Revolva is suitably garish in appearance as with many RED-related products.

It’s a lens mount and ND wheel built in-one. Both PL and EF mounts will be available, electronically also for aperture changes and lens data (exactly the same as the RED EF mount).

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AXIOM Open-Source Cinema Camera Unveils New Design and Recording solutions

 Gear  Comments Off on AXIOM Open-Source Cinema Camera Unveils New Design and Recording solutions
Dec 102017
 

Apertus has unveiled new major updates regarding technological and design solutions for AXIOM, the world’s first open-hardware and open-software cinema camera. Read on to learn more about this fascinating camera. 

 

AXIOM

Backed by a team of experts from a large swathe of technological and artistic fields (developers, filmmakers, engineers and artists), the apertus° project is stepping forward to the next level of manufacturing and delivering of the AXIOM camera.

cinema5D has been following the progression of this ambitious project from its beginnings, and it is indeed fascinating to see this open-source camera taking shape. It’s actually finally starting to look like a cinema camera!

AXIOM camera main features:

– 4K resolution

– Super35 sensor

– Global shutter

– Up to 15 stops dynamic range

– Up to 300 fps

– 12 bit

– Target price well below $10,000

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Fstoppers Reviews the ZhongYi Mitakon Speedmaster 35mm f/0.95 for Fujifilm

 Gear  Comments Off on Fstoppers Reviews the ZhongYi Mitakon Speedmaster 35mm f/0.95 for Fujifilm
Dec 102017
 

Over the past few years, Zhongyi Optics have introduced several lenses in their Mitakon “Speedmaster” series of reasonably-priced, well-constructed, super-fast manual focus lenses. The 35mm f/0.95 Mark II lens falls straight into that category. We’ll be looking at the Fujifilm mount version, but this lens is also available for EOS-M and Sony E cameras. So, let’s get into it and look at sharpness, build quality, and, of course, bokeh.

I picked up this lens a little over a month ago and was initially a little disappointed with it. It didn’t seem to fit the Fujifilm system all that well and it certainly didn’t fit my style of shooting. That would all change over time as I got used to the way it was designed and learned to work with it for certain types of shooting. It’s certainly not an all-rounder, but it is a beautiful lens and one worth considering if you like to shoot wide open a lot.

Build Quality and Handling

The all-metal-and-glass construction of the ZY Mitakon 35mm f/0.95 makes for an “old-school” feeling lens. When I first picked it up, I found it reminiscent of the Nikkor 35mm f/1.4 I used to use on my old Nikon FM. The resistance in the focus ring and the weight were the first things that stood out to me.

At 460 grams and just 63x60mm in size, it is a stocky lens that feels very solid in the hand. It’s almost too heavy on the smaller Fujifilm bodies and I found that it felt best on the X-Pro2. On the X-T2, or especially with the smaller bodies, it tips the center of balance too far forward and I felt like I was constantly supporting the lens and not the body. Compared to Fujifilm’s 35mm offerings it is much larger and heavier and you will instantly notice the difference.

The aperture ring is positioned at the front of the lens and is declicked. Both of these things feel rather strange on a Fujifilm body at first and take some getting used to. The aperture ring is far too easy to knock in the position it is in. Perhaps a lock switch would help to stop it from rotating with everything it touches. I have found that keeping it at f/0.95 (and let’s face it, that’s why you buy the lens) is quite difficult in the field. I’m constantly having to check the ring before I raise the camera to my eye. This declicked design may be useful for video shooters, but to be honest, I’d prefer a clicked aperture for stills.

The front element of the lens also sits disconcertingly close to the end of the lens barrel and the package doesn’t come with a lens hood. This is disappointing in a $500-plus lens and I would hope that ZhongYi includes hoods with their future lenses. There are a few options out there from third-party manufacturers, so you can certainly get one to fit.

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Freefly Movi is a Cinematic Gimbal for Your Smartphone

 Gear  Comments Off on Freefly Movi is a Cinematic Gimbal for Your Smartphone
Dec 072017
 

 

Freefly creates professional drone and gimbal solutions for the cinema industry, and today it released a specialized gimbal for smartphones: the Freefly Movi.

“Movi’s incredible stabilization technology is the same found in our professional rigs,” says Freefly. “Freefly Gimbals are first-in-class stabilizers used in multimillion-dollar films.”

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10 Handy Photoshop Shortcuts for Working with Layers

 Technique  Comments Off on 10 Handy Photoshop Shortcuts for Working with Layers
Dec 072017
 

Adobe just released this helpful 2-minute video that shares 10 handy shortcuts you can use in Photoshop when working with layers.

Here’s a quick rundown of the 10 shortcuts (watch the video above for visual demonstrations):

1. Add layer masks to hide all

To quickly add a layer mask to hide all of a layer, just hold down the Option key on Mac (or Alt on Windows) and click on the “Add Layer Mask” button in the Layers panel.

2. Delete layer masks

Instead of dragging a layer mask into the bin, you can just right click the layer mask itself and delete it from the tooltip menu that appears.

3. Add a layer mask based on selections

Creating a layer mask of a selection you have made is a useful thing to do for Photoshop users. Clicking the “Add Layer Mask” button will reveal your selection, but if you want to hide it then you just need to hold the Option key on Mac (or Alt for Windows) while clicking.

4. Invert a layer mask

If you want to invert your layer mask, just hold Command + I on Mac (or Control + I on Windows) to quickly move between the two.

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The Sigma 85mm 1.4: One Year Later

 Cinematography, Gear  Comments Off on The Sigma 85mm 1.4: One Year Later
Nov 282017
 

About this time last year, the Sigma 85mm 1.4 Art series lens was released and I went ahead and decided to pull the trigger and invest in the new glass. I had heard great things about other entries in the art lineup and understandably Sigma’s new 85mm focal length was getting a solid amount of hype. For the past year, I have been shooting exclusively with Sigma’s 85mm. It’s been the only lens in my camera bag and the only lens I’ve used for a straight year. What follows are my impressions after a solid year of use; what I like about the lens and what I don’t like.

Let’s start out with some of the things that I love about this lens. After a year of continuous use, I can say that there is no question that the Sigma 85mm 1.4 is a great piece of glass. I am first and foremost a portrait photographer so the focal length itself is a no-brainer for me. As a short/medium telephoto lens, the 85mm gives me a gorgeous level of background compression, beautiful bokeh, and I don’t need to be overly concerned with facial distortion if I come in for a closeup shot. It’s been said before and will be said again that the 85mm focal length is pretty much perfect for portraits.

As I currently live in Colorado and have generally have access to gorgeous sunsets for most of the year I have developed a love for shooting backlit images. If you’ve ever shot backlit before, you know that depending on the angle and position of the sunlight, as well as your own preferences regarding lens flare, some lenses can be finicky about nailing focus. This is understandable as you’re basically asking your camera to nail focus while either direct or angled light is coming right into the lens. I can say with confidence that the Sigma 85mm handles backlighting scenarios like a boss. This is one of the first things that I noticed about this lens; even in less than ideal backlit situations, the lens is wildly successful at getting great focus right where you want it.

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Going Doc-Style with the Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro on Robbie Williams’ Europe Tour

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Going Doc-Style with the Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro on Robbie Williams’ Europe Tour
Nov 282017
 

Many filmmakers, including myself are hesitant about using the Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro and URSA Mini 4.6K cameras in documentary environments, but James Tonkin of Hangman proves us wrong, taking the URSA cameras into the battlefield of Robbie William’s European Tour 2017.

James Tonik’s URSA Mini Pro with a Letus gimbal and remote focus rig

James Tonkin was recently tasked to document Williams’ 2017 European tour in its entirety. From rehearsals through to live shows, to the all-important backstage moments with Robbie Williams, Tonkin’s primary camera choices were the Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro and URSA Mini 4.6K as well as the RED Weapon. For some run and gun filmmakers this might not be the first choice of camera systems when it comes to filming documentaries. In comparison to others, they have drawbacks in lowlight situations and handling. But from a quality standpoint the choice certainly makes sense, if one can make them work documentary style – and Tonkin did.

With a relationship spanning 16 years, Tonkin already had a unique understanding of when and where to capture the tours most potent moments. Furthermore preparation ahead of the tour alongside an understanding of the end goal was imperative for delivering a high-quality production that would meet the brief.

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