Jul 052015
 

cuba-filmmaking

Now that the U.S. and Cuba have confirmed the official opening of their respective embassies this month, interest in Cuba continues to mount, not just among U.S. filmmakers, but also among producers from Latin America and Europe.

“Ever since both countries announced the thaw in their relations, more film and TV producers from the U.S., Latin America and Europe have been making inquiries and visiting Havana to explore and, in some cases, begin developing their projects here,” said Lia Rodriguez, the Havana Film Festival’s industry department head. A Spanish-German miniseries, “Vientos de Cuaresma,” is currently shooting in Havana.

Some American filmmakers have managed to make their feature films in Cuba, despite current restrictions, by including documentary footage and reenactments to qualify. To date, only U.S. docs are allowed to shoot in Cuba.

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variety.com

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Jul 052015
 

modifiedf3

Did you know that a Nikon F3 still photography film SLR was used to shoot the 1984 movie Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom? The mine cart chase scene in the film would have been too expensive if the track were built to scale, so George Lucas and Steve Spielberg turned to the special effects team at Industrial Light and Magic. They modified a Nikon F3 to shoot the chase scene in miniature using stop motion.

By adding a large film magazine and motor drive to the back of the camera, the team created a stop-motion camera that could expose 50 feet of motion picture film for just 15 seconds of action. In total, the scene took 4 months to shoot, with 24 still frames going into each second of action.

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petapixel

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Jul 022015
 
Industrial Design by LUNAR.

Industrial Design by LUNAR.

Virtual reality startup Jaunt is getting ready to build its own cameraJaunt announced a new series of camera systems code-named Neo Tuesday that promises 360-degree high dynamic range video capture for cinematic virtual reality (VR) experiences.

Jaunt has been in the business of producing cinematic VR since 2013. But up until now, it has used custom rigs made from off-the-shelf cameras and 3-D printed components to capture VR video, which has had a number of downsides. For one, the cameras are not synchronized, making both recording and processing content cumbersome.

But Jaunt’s director of hardware engineering Koji Gardiner also said that most off-the-shelf cameras have inadequate image sensors for VR. A 360-degree camera captures the entire scene, making it close to impossible to hide a light kit from a viewer’s eye, which is why most VR is being shot with natural light. “Lighting is hard for VR,” Gardiner said. That’s why the Neo systems use a custom lens design and large image sensors to capture more light.

A number of companies have built their own camera rigs for VR, with some embracing very expensive, high-resolution cameras while others simply use GoPros or other action cams. There’s also intense debate about the number of cameras used in a VR rig. Google recently introduced its own camera rig called Jump that’s based on 16 GoPro cameras.

Read More:

variety.com

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Jul 022015
 

polarrheader

The popular browser-based photo editor Polarr has now arrived on mobile devices. After launching in the iTunes App Store late last week, the app was featured by Apple and was downloaded a whopping 250,000 times in the first 48 hours.

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petapixel

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Jun 302015
 

Filmmaker Sebastian Solberg has compiled 10 important drone filmmaking tips for anyone new to the increasingly popular method. Watch his video above and read his tips below to learn more about drone safety and how to use drones to their full potential.

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indiewire

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Jun 302015
 

Argentinian professional photographer and retoucher Joaquin Villaverde has a knack for restoring and colorizing old photographs.

beforeandafterinpost

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petapixel

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Jun 292015
 

releases1

There are a number of easy-to-use model release form apps out there already, but Snapwire wants to do better. The photo marketplace has launched its own free app called Releases. Designed for professional photographers, the app lets you easily create, sign, and send model and properly releases using your iPhone.

“Releases are important because they protect you from potential lawsuits where people claim invasion of privacy or defamation after you’ve photographed them,” Snapwire says. “Model releases state that the person in the photo consents to be photographed, as well for you to use the images.”

“Model releases apply to any situation where the person is recognizable, and are extremely important to obtain.”

The Releases app includes standard industry templates provided by Snapwire, ASMP, Getty Images, and Shutterstock.

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petapixel

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