May 252016
 

There is no such thing as an action camera in the Japanese company’s lineup of cameras. Until now. Today, Olympus introduced their latest piece of gear, the Stylus TG-Tracker action cam.

Yet another action cam!

It seems that we are witnessing another competitor emerging in the territory of the original inventor of the action cam, GoPro. The freshly announced Stylus TG-Tracker comes with a set of unique features and a form factor of its own, so it’s far from being another copycat GoPro clone. That said, we will have to wait to find out whether it can compete with the current “go-to” action cameras.

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cinema5d

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May 252016
 

There’s a small lie that’s snowballing into a huge lie when it comes to 360-degree videos and virtual reality.

You see, with the rise of VR, there’s been an inevitable rush to produce content for it. People want stuff to watch in their expensive VR headsets, and many content creators and companies are arguably misleading consumers with 360-degree videos (and cameras that shoot 360-degree videos).

Yes, most 360-degree videos are viewable in a VR headset and allow for omnidirectional viewing experiences, but they aren’t real VR. They’re still just flat 2D videos with no depth to them.

But after taking a look at several 360-degree videos shot with the Vuze, I’m now convinced that for any content to be classified truly as VR content, it needs to have 3D stereoscopic depth.

HumanEyes’ Vuze is an $800 VR camera that’s slightly larger than a Roku or Apple TV media streaming box. Unlike other 360-degree cameras that are mistakenly referred to as “VR cameras” that only have one or two spherical lenses, the Vuze has eight cameras — two on each of its four edges. Each camera records in full HD.

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mashable

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May 182016
 

In its first five years, the Google Cultural Institute scanned and archived 200 works of art in super-high-resolution gigapixel images. Now in just the past few months, it has managed to scan another 1,000.

The sudden expansion is thanks to a new camera developed by Google, simply called the Art Camera. It’s designed to be far simpler to use than other camera setups, making it easier for museums and other institutions to start digitizing the art and documents in their collection. And critically, it’s also much faster.

“The capture time has been reduced drastically,” says Marzia Niccolai, technical program manager at the Cultural Institute. “Previously it could take almost a day to capture an image. To give you an idea, now if you have a one meter by one meter painting, it would take 30 minutes.”

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theverge

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May 162016
 

If I ever find myself wallowing in a creative rut, I have a few surefire ways out of that hole. My most effective method, although probably not the quickest, is to watch a documentary on another photographer. They need not be similar to your own brand of photography; in fact, I often feel it’s better when they aren’t. Whatever sub-genre of photography the subject does, a documentary is invariably a rich vein of ideas and inspiration.

If you think I’ve missed any out of this list, please leave a comment with your suggestion.

Bill Cunningham New York

Without question one of my favourites, “Bill Cunningham New York” is an insight into the godfather of street fashion photography, a movement that has generated a lot of steam in the last ten years. Bill isn’t just a photographer with many other strings to his bow like most; he is a disciple of photography and an index of street fashion for over five decades. His life has been a mission to record street style and he has reaped the sort of rewards his dedication deserves. Bill is a hero of mine and I implore you to watch this.

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fstoppers

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May 162016
 

Photomerge_1

If you’ve ever tried to stitch a panorama in Photoshop, you know that the program is not always up to the task. In this “Photoshop Secrets” tutorial, photographer Jimmy McIntyre will show you two tricks that will help Photoshop stitch even the most difficult tiles together into a beautiful pano.

The first 4:40 of the video is a small bit of self-promotion followed by tips on how to shoot panoramas to make stitching them in Photoshop easier: he talks about overlap between tiles, shooting a lot of extra info around the edges, and more. These are important tips if you’ve never shot panoramas, but if you want to skip straight to the tips on stitching together difficult panoramas, jump straight to 4:40.

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petapixel

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May 162016
 

Pilotfly H2

The Pilotfly H2 is the finest one-hand-gimbal for mirrorless and DSLR cameras we‘ve ever designed.

The Pilotfly H2 introduces a whole new way of video shooting with highest versatility, flexibility and power efficiency. The 32bit technology with Triple-MCUs and 2 integrated IMU sensors offers you a more powerful shooting experience than ever before.

The ergonomic lightweight handle is equipped with an easy-to-use 4-way joystick, mode button and a power/battery status LED. Now, three integrated ¼(inch) screw holes (one on each side and one at the bottom) give you the utmost flexibility for mounting other devices, like an external display or a microphone. Additionally, you can put it on a tripod, extension pole, slider or on a jib — everything is possible now depending on your shooting requirements. And we even went one step beyond: Now you are able to detach the handle and easily exchange it to extend your operation time.

The 3 axes of the gimbal consist of a CNC aluminum alloy construction and is tool-less designed to balance your camera even faster. The new brushless motors were designed with integrated MCUs. We reduced their size of about 30% compared to standard motors on other gimbals. This makes the Pilotfly H2 the most elegant and ergonomic one-hand-gimbal on the market. And we don’t want compromises anymore! Therefore we designed the motor without limitation on YAW . Consequently, you can turn it 360° without having to worry about damaging the cables. Full 360° time-lapse is possible as well now!

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pilotfly

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Apr 182016
 

In a bold move from Hasselblad, the new H6D-100c looks set to include some

While it’s been clear for some time that a move beyond super 35mm and even full frame sensors would materialise at the high-end of digital cinema acquisition, the likes of Arri’s Alexa65 reaches a niche demographic among the world’s top cinematographers, and is rental-only. It’s never been totally clear where a more mainstream offering would come from. At EUR 28,900 the H6D-100c is hardly mainstream in the sense of the average DSLR, but it will be a commercial production camera, stocked by dealers, and accessible by anyone willing to part with the cash.

If you are craving the ultra shallow depth of field, and the commanding imaging aesthetic of the ultra large format look in video (think Lubezki’s arresting cinematography with the Alexa65 in The Revenant, and Robert Richardson’s work with Ultra Panavision 70 in The Hateful Eight), it looks like the new Hasselblad H6D-100c might give you just that.

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cinema5d

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